Prince Harry attends youth event in Bahamas on Jubilee tour

Prince Harry talks to blind student Anna Albury Prince Harry spent time with blind Bahamian student Anna Albury, who has won an award for overcoming her disability

Prince Harry has attended a stadium event to celebrate the achievements of youth in the Bahamas as part of his Jubilee tour on behalf of the Queen.

Thousands of school children, rangers, cadets and scouts screamed when the prince emerged at the Thomas A Robinson stadium in the capital, Nassau.

On Sunday, Prince Harry went to a cathedral service honouring the Queen.

The prince's next Jubilee stop is Jamaica, from where he will travel to Brazil for his charity, Sentebale.

Prince Harry sat beside Bahamas' minister for youth, sports and culture Charles Maynard at the youth achievement event in Nassau.

He also met blind student Anna Albury, the 2011 Primary School Student of the Year, who gave a speech to the crowds. The schoolgirl chatted with the prince as they sat together in Bahamas' national stadium.

She described him as "our Prince Harry" and said having him in their Caribbean homeland allowed the nation to "showcase our unique, vibrant culture through expressions of music, dance and drama".

Afterwards the 12-year-old said: "It was amazing to meet Prince Harry. I was so excited and I just loved it and can't wait to tell my family about it.

"He was very friendly and he was asking me about my speech, how old I was and where I was from. He asked me if I had been blind since birth."

In his short speech, Harry told the 11,000 schoolchildren who gathered in the stadium: "I know Her Majesty would wish me to extend her personal encouragement to you all in your endeavours, whether they be in education, civic and community activities or in the sporting arena."

Among those attending the event was Miss Bahamas, Anastagia Pierre, 23. The beauty pageant winner on Sunday described the prince as a "hot" bachelor.

Memorial wreath

Prince Harry had earlier been meant to join the crew of a Royal Bahamian Defence Force patrol boat on a naval exercise, but had to move to a media boat after the military vessel broke down. He eventually landed on tiny Harbour island, where he greeted crowds of tourists and locals.

Prince Harry is also set to visit a defence base before leaving the Bahamas for Jamaica.

The royal began his tour in Belize, where the prince named a boulevard after his grandmother and took part in a street party. He also visited the ruined Mayan city of Xunantunich, and laid a wreath at the memorial to British soldiers who have died in the country.

Analysis

Fifty years on, Jamaica is getting ready for the arrival of the Queen's grandson. Workers have been putting a fresh lick of paint on the governor-general's residence, King's House, and the gardens are getting manicured.

But it was here, only two months ago, that Jamaica's newly-elected Prime Minister, Portia Simpson-Miller, made a pledge to remove the Queen as head of state.

Jamaica debates republic option

The trip to Brazil, where Prince Harry is due on Friday, will be in support of the government and his charity Sentebale, which supports orphans and vulnerable children in the southern African country of Lesotho.

Members of the Royal Family are visiting the 15 countries other than the UK where the Queen is head of state, along with some other Commonwealth nations, as part of this year's Diamond Jubilee celebrations.

Other royal tours as part of the Jubilee celebrations include a visit by the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge to the Far East and the Pacific.

The Prince of Wales and Duchess of Cornwall will visit Australia, Canada, New Zealand and Papua New Guinea, the Duke of York will travel to India and the Princess Royal is set to visit Mozambique and Zambia.

The host countries are likely to hold a range of events for the visiting royals, from official banquets and public celebrations to events that showcase the individual nations.

The Diamond Jubilee will also see the Queen, 85, and the Duke of Edinburgh, 90, travel as widely as possible across the UK to mark the occasion.

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