Newspaper review: Water shortages concern papers

A look at the first editions of the UK papers

The declaration of critical water shortages in south and east England is taken seriously - it is the lead for three of the papers: the Times, the Independent and the Daily Express.

The Express has the headline: "Hosepipe ban within weeks".

The Daily Telegraph says that to declare a drought in February is unprecedented.

Let's keep our fingers crossed for a month-and-a-half of miserable, grey and wet weather, the Daily Mail suggests.

Border controls

The damning report on UK border security makes the lead for the Daily Telegraph and the Daily Mail.

The Mail says a terrifying culture of arrogance and incompetence has emerged. For the Telegraph, it lays bare the failures of border controls.

It believes the positions of Home Secretary Theresa May and Immigration Minister Damian Green are secure.

But any repeat of the circumstances would spell the end of ministerial careers, it adds.

Tough task

The pensioner who confronted Health Secretary Andrew Lansley over his plans for changes to the NHS in England is the Daily Mirror's main story.

The paper describes June Hautot as "the mum who spoke for Britain".

But the Independent says she pulled off the near-impossible task of making Mr Lansley look reasonable.

She screamed and ranted, the paper adds, and made the health secretary look like an amiable old bumbler who at least knew how to be polite.

Off the sofa

The Guardian says a study suggests that NHS guidelines for losing weight are seriously flawed.

Researchers found people lost only half as much weight as expected if they followed advice given in the UK and by US health organisations.

The Sun looks at the government's £126m Youth Contract, being launched by Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg.

The aim is to get Britain's PlayStation generation off the sofa and into work, the paper declares.

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