Newspaper review: Oxford Street stabbing in spotlight

A look at the first editions of the UK papers

The stabbing to death of an 18-year-old in Oxford Street is the main news in The Sun, the Daily Mail and the Daily Express.

The Mail claimed: "The biggest sales rush in British history was marked by bloodshed as a teenager was murdered in a suspected row over a pair of trainers."

The Express talks of shoppers fleeing a Foot Locker shop in terror.

One couple told the paper they were detained with their baby by police.

The Times leads with a claim that NHS hospitals will be free to earn up to half their income from private work.

The paper says the move will re-ignite "coalition splits over health reforms".

Senior Liberal Democrats apparently see it as "a further sign of the Conservatives blurring the distinction between public and private provision".

The shadow health secretary, Andy Burnham tells the paper David Cameron is determined to turn the NHS into a US-style commercial system.

The Mail says the Justice Secretary, Ken Clarke, will next month unveil plans to ban convicted criminals from claiming compensation for injuries.

Every year criminals claim around £5m from the Criminal Injuries Compensation Authority, the paper says.

It claims cases include burglars demanding money for injuries sustained while escaping from a crime scene.

The Independent believes Mr Clarke's move is "certain to face a challenge in the courts".

An editorial in The Guardian suggests the Communities Secretary, Eric Pickles, is guilty of "policy-making in the dark".

It says he wants local councils to save money by switching off street lights.

But the paper says the move could lead to more accidents, more crime and crucially, more fear of crime, especially among women and the elderly.

The Daily Mirror pays tribute to its columnist, Sue Carroll, 58, who has lost "her brave fight against cancer".

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