Cpl Mark Palin killed in Afghanistan explosion

Corporal Mark Anthony Palin Corporal Mark Anthony Palin was escorting a team recovering bomb components

A British soldier killed in an explosion in southern Afghanistan has been named as Cpl Mark Anthony Palin.

The MoD said the 32-year-old from 1st Battalion The Rifles died in the Nahr-e Saraj district of Helmand province on Monday morning.

Cpl Palin, from Plymouth, was with a team clearing and recovering a cache of Improvised Explosive Device bomb parts.

His death takes the number of British military deaths on operations in Afghanistan since 2001 to 377.

Corporal Palin leaves behind wife, Carla and son Lennon.

Cpl Palin's family said: "Mark was unique, one in a million. He was loved deeply by all his family and friends. He was a devoted family man who adored his son and was so looking forward to the birth of his daughter.

"He will be deeply missed by all his family, friends and everyone who knew him."

Cpl Palin enlisted in the Army in 1996, joining the 1st Battalion the Devonshire and Dorset Regiment in Paderborn and served in Northern Ireland and Iraq.

He deployed to Afghanistan this year following a posting training recruits at the Army Foundation College, Harrogate.

Cpl Palin's commanding officer, Major Mike Turnbull, also paid tribute to his sense of humour and professionalism.

"Everybody knew him and everybody loved him. He never ceased to make people laugh - it was one of his greatest gifts. He was a team player in the truest sense. I have rarely seen a man give more for those around him.

"He had fought hard against injury in order to deploy to Afghanistan, and there was no question in his mind of doing otherwise. He was a fine man, a true Rifleman, and we feel his loss deeply."

Serjeant Chris Wainwright said Cpl Palin - nicknamed Maldoon - would always be remembered by those who served alongside him in B Company.

"He was one of the most well known and well liked blokes in the Battalion. A genuinely nice guy who was instantly likable. He leaves a huge void not only in the company but in The Rifles."

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