Royal wedding dress to go on show at Buckingham Palace

The Duchess of Cambridge The Duchess's dress will be placed on display over the summer

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The Duchess of Cambridge's wedding dress is to be placed on display at Buckingham Palace.

A multi-tiered replica of the wedding cake will also go on view, when the palace is next opened to the public.

Meanwhile, St James's Palace says that the duke and duchess are to move into a home at Kensington Palace.

The couple will spend time both there and north Wales, where Prince William is currently working as an RAF search and rescue helicopter pilot.

The prince had previously lived at the palace with Prince Harry and Diana, Princess of Wales, after her divorce from the Prince of Wales.

The London apartment he will share with his new bride will not be the one he used to live in.

The couple currently share an apartment at Clarence House with Prince Harry when they are in the capital.

They are expected to move within the next few weeks.

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Peter Hunt

The wedding cake will also be on display - not the half-eaten original, but a multi-tiered replica”

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A spokesman from St James's Palace said: "We can confirm that The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge's official London residence will temporarily become a property at Kensington Palace.

"A number of options for longer-term solutions are still being considered.

"The couple's main home will continue to be their house on Anglesey, and their household office will continue to be based at St James's Palace."

Dress details

Buckingham Palace will next be open to the public from 23 July until 3 October.

The lace applique for the dress's bodice and skirt was hand-made by the Royal School of Needlework.

Individual flowers were hand-cut from lace and hand-engineered on to ivory silk-tulle to create a design incorporating the rose, thistle, daffodil and shamrock.

The bride's veil, made of layers of ivory silk-tulle with a trim of hand-embroidered flowers, was also embroidered by the Royal School of Needlework and was held in place by the Cartier Halo tiara, which was lent to the duchess by the Queen.

The tiara was made in 1936 and bought by the Duke of York - who became King George VI - for the Duchess of York. She later became Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother.

The multi-tiered traditional fruit cake made for the wedding was hand-made using British ingredients and decorated with sugar flowers.

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