Olympic tickets: Your stories

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London 2012 Olympic ticket applicants are starting to find out if they have been successful.

People who have been successful will be informed about their allocation by 24 June.

BBC website readers have been sharing their experiences of the ticket application process.

For the latest on current ticket availability, check our Q&A.

David Hall, London

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David Hall

It is a bizarre and over-complicated system”

End Quote David Hall, London

My wife received an email from the London Organising Committee of the Olympic and Paralympic Games (Locog) saying that they had tried to take money from her Barclaycard Visa debit account but was unable to. But Co-op says no-one tried to make a debit.

My wife can't find any details for Locog to get in touch with them to find out what is going on. There is almost no way of contacting them.

The bank has assured her that there are adequate funds in the account so we cannot understand why Locog couldn't take a payment.

We have applied for a range of tickets to the value of several hundred pounds, from the opening and closing ceremonies to the women's football final.

We tried to include tickets for at least each one of the different venues. We also included a few of the less desirable heats.

When my wife spoke to the Co-op bank they said they have had similar calls from other people. So what's going wrong?

It is a bizarre and over-complicated system which my wife says is typical of this country's approach to many things. Why can't we be like other countries and apply on a first come, first served basis?

David Needham, Chesterfield, Derbyshire

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The UK system is bad because we don't know what tickets we have got”

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The ticketing process has been a farce. I applied for 80 tickets across 20 sessions - some I knew I was unlikely to get, but I did also apply for a lot of the minor sports.

On Friday my credit card was debited for the cost of one session - £86 which means that only one of my applications has been successful.

I don't even know which tickets I have, although I suspect they are for table tennis which I only applied for in the expectation I would be successful in getting tickets for other events over the same weekend.

London 2012 - Begin your journey here

London view

Because of this fiasco I have had to go on the German ticketing site Detour and buy tickets from them, although the choice is now limited, I now have at least some tickets and can start arranging travel and hotels.

The UK system is bad because we don't know what tickets we have got. It would have been better not to have applied through the UK system at all.

At no stage have they told people how many tickets are available at each price level.

Had we known this information we may have considered applying for tickets at a higher price level.

Colm Devlin, London

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Colm Devlin

I would have been prepared to spend a bit more than I have”

End Quote Colm Devlin, London

I applied for almost £1,600 worth of tickets and on Sunday my Visa account had a charge of nearly £500. It should be interesting to see what I have ended up with.

I applied for tickets for events including cycling, swimming, beach volleyball, and gymnastics, among others. I applied for the same sort of events with a friend, as we wanted to double our chances. She has also had money debited.

We picked a few wild card events for atmosphere and to see the venues. I understand will we find out on 24 June.

I would have been prepared to spend a bit more than I have. In some cases we may end up with two pairs of tickets and if this happens, hopefully we will be able to sell them back - we don't have any other friends who would be interested.

We both put in for the 4x100m relay days and went for the mid-range tickets - our most expensive but this is probably one of the most oversubscribed so we don't know if we will be successful.

Lauren Webb, Hockley, Essex

From what I remember, I have applied for equestrian, table tennis, athletics, gymnastics, football and the opening ceremony. I cannot now get on to my account on the 2012 website to check what I applied for.

The system seems disorganised. I have ordered tickets for my husband, daughter and son. The website says the lead booker has to go, but I heard that Seb Coe says that this is not the case.

Some of the events I have ordered three tickets and others I have ordered four. It also says that you can sell tickets to family and friends but as the lead booker you have to be there.

I have ordered £1,400 worth of tickets but I don't want all of them. I would like to know, as I have to budget if £1,400 is going to be debited from my account.

I have heard that we will not find out if we are going to get tickets until 24 June.

Phil Steele, Liverpool

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I am absolutely buzzing and on cloud nine”

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I looked at my account earlier and noticed that there was a discrepancy between the available amount and the balance, and I saw that £750 had been taken out of a possible £1,000.

I applied to see the 100m final, second tier tickets at a cost of £120 each - I may have these.

I am looking forward to logging on, on 24 June when I am at the Glastonbury Festival to see which tickets I have.

I am absolutely buzzing and on cloud nine.

Denise Mitchell, Storrington, West Sussex

I had to take a chance that I wouldn't get the full allocation, so I applied for around £4,000 worth of tickets for 20 events. I got about £700 worth.

The money was taken out of my joint account on Saturday. I do not know what I have been allocated yet - I don't know whether it is my first choice or my 20th! I don't think the system is fair for people like me with a limited income.

I think I have got three sessions. I applied for swimming, athletics, archery, diving, and rowing, among others.

The tickets are for five of us. If we get some of the popular ones, one of us will have to stay at home because four tickets is the maximum allocation. It's a funny system.

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