Julian Assange 'secret' Sweden rape trial claim denied

Julian Assange: ''We have not been able to present my side of the story''

Claims Julian Assange would face a "secret trial" over sexual assault claims in Sweden are inaccurate, a UK extradition hearing has been told.

Clare Montgomery QC, for the Swedish authorities, said evidence from a trial would be heard in private but the arguments would be made in public.

The Wikileaks founder's lawyer said his client might not have a fair trial.

Sweden wants to question Mr Assange over allegations of sexual assault, which he denies.

The case was adjourned to 24 February.

At Belmarsh Magistrates' Court in south-east London, Geoffrey Robertson QC, representing the Wikileaks founder, said rape trials in Sweden were "secret" and heard behind closed doors - a claim that was denied by representatives of the Swedish authorities.

In addition to this, he said, criticism of Mr Assange by Sweden's prime minister could damage his chance of a fair trial.

Fredrik Reinfeldt's remarks had shown "complete contempt for the presumption of innocence", he said.

Start Quote

Judge refuses to adjourn extradition because 'we need some finality & there will always be further developments in this case'”

End Quote BBC's Anna Adams tweeting from court

Mr Robertson told the hearing that the prime minister's comments this week had created a "toxic atmosphere" in Sweden.

They included claims that Mr Assange and his lawyers had been "condescending and damaging to Sweden", and implied they thought women's rights were worthless, Mr Robertson said.

"Mr Assange is public enemy number one as a result of the prime minister's statement," he said.

Ms Montgomery QC, for the Swedish authorities, denied the prime minister had vilified Mr Assange.

"You might think those who seek to fan the flames of a media firestorm can't be surprised when they get burnt," she said.

'Smear campaign'

Mr Reinfeldt was quoted on Tuesday stressing that Sweden had an independent judiciary, countering the view expressed by Mr Assange that the allegations against him are politically motivated.

"Let's not forget what is at stake here: It is women's right to get a hearing on whether they have been the victims of abuse," said Mr Reinfeldt, according to the AFP news agency.

"I find if very regrettable that [Assange's defence team] in this way is trying to... make their rights appear worth very little."

On the final day of the extradition hearing on Friday, the judge said he was minded to take two weeks to decide on the possible removal to Sweden.

Mr Assange, an Australian citizen, was released on bail by a High Court judge in December after spending nine days in Wandsworth prison.

He denies sexually assaulting two female supporters during a visit to Stockholm in August and says the allegations are part of a smear campaign against him and his whistle-blowing website.

More on This Story

The BBC is not responsible for the content of external Internet sites

More UK stories

RSS

Features

BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.