Soldier killed in Afghanistan named as Cpl Steven Dunn

Corporal Steven Dunn Cpl Steven Dunn died from injuries sustained on Tuesday

A British soldier killed in a bomb blast in Afghanistan has been named by the Ministry of Defence.

Cpl Steven Dunn, 27, from Gateshead, of 216 Parachute Signal Squadron, Royal Corps of Signals, died from injuries sustained on Tuesday.

The soldier was patrolling the Nahr-e Saraj district in Helmand when his vehicle was hit by a roadside bomb.

His family paid tribute to a "loving husband" and "doting dad" whose death had left "a huge hole in their lives".

The soldier, who leaves behind his wife Cheryl and daughter Emily, had been on a tour in Iraq and two previous tours of Afghanistan.

In a statement, Cpl Dunn's family said: "He lived for the Army especially 216 Parachute Signal Squadron and worked hard to get his wings of which he was very proud.

"We are all immensely proud of all that he achieved in his short life. He died doing a job he loved and excelled at."

And Maj Alistair Fawcett, Officer Commanding 216 Parachute Signal Squadron, said Cpl Dunn "died doing a job he loved".

"At every turn he strove to improve the lot of his men. He was always in the thick of it and his time in Afghanistan was no exception," he added.

Some 347 UK service personnel have been killed in operations in Afghanistan since 2001.

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