Clone row Newmeadow is one of Scotland's biggest farms

Livestock at Drumduan Farm Newmeadow is home to the biggest Holstein herd in the Highlands

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The farm at the centre of a row over meat from a cloned cow's offspring is one of the biggest farming businesses in Scotland.

Newmeadow, also known as Drumduan Farm, is home to the largest Holstein cattle herd in the Highlands.

It is run by the Innes family who have been farming near Auldearn in the Highlands for more than 50 years and the milking cows produced have won prizes in competitions.

Callum Innes runs the herd with his son Steve, while another son Stuart manages arable land.

In June, the farm was awarded £1m from the Scottish government to expand the dairy herd from 700 to 1,200 cows.

The money from the government's Rural Priorities Scheme was allocated for the building of a new dairy parlour.

Milk from the herd supplies a creamery in nearby Nairn.

The landscape around the village of Auldearn and Nairn, the nearest town, is of farm and woodland rolling down from hills to the south to the shores of the Moray Firth.

The fertile soil and favourable climate also allows farms in the area to produce fruit and cereal crops.

The Highlands are better known for large-scale sheep production and game shooting estates.

Newmeadow's part in the row over meat from a cloned cow's offspring entering the UK food chain also comes as the Black Isle Show - the Highland's biggest agricultural event - opened.

Agriculture is an important sector of the Scottish economy.

The majority of land in Scotland is farmed and agriculture is responsible for much of the country's food exports.

In 2008, Scotland produced 1.132 billion litres of milk - an 11% reduction on 2007 production and was worth an estimated £303m according to Scottish government figures.

Beef production, however, is the largest sector of the farming industry in Scotland.

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