Nissan launches Nismo smartwatch for drivers

 
Nissan smart watch The smartwatch aims to unite driver and car

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A smartwatch that monitors the performance of a vehicle as well as the driver has been launched by car manufacturer Nissan.

Like many other smartwatches, the Nissan Nismo measures the user's heart rate, temperature and other biometrics.

But it also allows users to keep an eye on their car's performance - including average speeds and fuel consumption.

Experts say that the watch could be an important step towards greater connectivity in cars.

"Connectivity is the new battleground for car manufacturers," said Chas Hallett, editor-in-chief of What Car?

"In-car internet is coming and now with consumer electronics focusing on watch-based connections, Nissan is getting ahead of the game and joining the two together very cleverly."

The Nismo watch can be connected to the car's on-board computer system to allow users to monitor vehicle telematics and performance data. Users can also receive tailored messages from Nissan via the gadget.

It was unveiled ahead of the Frankfurt Motor Show, which runs until 22 September.

Concentration levels
Samsung Galaxy Gear Samsung has just released its first smartwatch - the Galaxy Gear

"Wearable technology is fast becoming the next big thing and we want to take advantage of this innovative technology," said Gareth Dunsmore, marketing communications general manager at Nissan, Europe.

A glut of smartwatches has hit the market recently, including Samsung's Galaxy Gear and Sony's Smartwatch 2.

Car-connected watches could be even more useful than those offered by consumer electronic firms, thinks Mr Hallett.

"Imagine if you could heat up your car on a cold day before you got into it or shut the roof of your convertible when it started raining and it was parked outside," he said.

The Nissan Leaf electric car already allows users to interact with it via their mobile phone, said Mr Dunsmore, and such functionality should be available in the firm's next-generation watches.

The current gadget is one of the first products to come out of its Nismo laboratory, which captures live biometric and telematics data from Nissan racing cars and their drivers.

The lab plans to use electrocardiograms (ECG) and electroencephalograms (EEG) in the future to capture a range of heart and brainwave data.

The eventual aim would be to create wearable technology for drivers that can spot fatigue, monitor drivers' levels of concentration and emotions and record hydration levels.

The Nismo, which comes in three colours and has a battery life of around a week, can be controlled by two buttons on the screen.

 

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  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 88.

    "Experts say that the watch could be an important step towards greater connectivity in cars."
    Why? So here we have yet another gadget to distract drivers and bore guests to death at a party.
    For goodness sake, just dump all your useless gadgets, concentrate on the road ahead and drive safely with due consideration for other road users! That's all you need!

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 87.

    What's the last thing that goes through a smartwatch owners mind when they plow, head on into my full size pickup truck? Their heart rate.
    .

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 86.

    Another reason for car drivers to not pay attention, become distracted, drive lazily and dangerously. But more importantly, if you take away what little thought there is given to driving by the average driver, you're left with no thought at all.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 85.

    "The Nissan Leaf electric car already allows users to interact with it via their mobile phone, said Mr Dunsmore, and such functionality should be available in the firm's next-generation watches"
    ****
    WHY would you want to ?
    Might tell you the batteries flat I suppose or needs changing at £7 grand a time. That'll get the heart & brainwave messages leaping all over the place on yer smart watch

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 84.

    Another mindless gadget to distract the mindless people like phones and GPS.

    Be a nice change to concentrate on the road.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 83.

    Take the £50bn from HS2 and build a state of the art factory to produce a peoples' car, like the new Micra that is now built in India not Sunderland.
    Then we all buy these cars (a sacrifice for Jag owners, but we are all in it together aren't we?).
    Then we sell the factory to a foreign buyer and start all over again with another product.
    Pretty soon we'll be self-sufficient!

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 82.

    Well I think they need a watch that could somehow have control of the car in that it could control the driver bad actions before he goes switches on to go anywhere, before he/she switches on the ignition like "turn off your mobile" otherwise we ain't going nowhere, "you smell of drink, car ain't moving"? Have insurance, have we? etc. But alas, this watch like others have said, will only distract!

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 81.

    They are better off displaying that on a HUD than a stupid watch.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 80.

    useful if you crashed car, watch could send vitals to medics so when they arrive they would have more info.

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 79.

    Will this be called the Nissan Joke?

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 78.

    I'm turning Japanese
    I think I'm turning Japanese
    I really think so
    Turning Japanese
    I think I'm turning Japanese
    I really think so
    I'm turning Japanese
    I think I'm turning Japanese
    I really think so

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 77.

    If only we could reach that "driverless car" holy grail.. Imagine, missing the train and paging it to come get you... Saturday night at 3am - home from the pub and no fear of a DUI. Too tired to drive? Just take a kip and let it get you there.. I want it now...

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 76.

    If only Nissan made better cars. Would anyone really want to be seen down the pub wearing a Nissan watch?

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 75.

    Well, if this watch is as well made and reliable as my Qashqai then the only thing it will be good for is showing off your tan line...

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 74.

    Haven't Aviva done they same thing?
    I can't remember are they still british or not.
    It was so much easier when they were called Norwich Union.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 73.

    :) great...

    I don't drive but if i ever do, I'm going to build the car myself so I know that it isn't monitoring me when i don't want it to.

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 72.

    how about inventing a little "signal dampener" that turns on when you start the engine!

    Have had to dodge 3 people in the last week attempting to drive while on their phones. Lost count of how many others I saw too!

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 71.

    I drive & know when I'm feeling slightly tired, my speed,how far I am from the car in front. I do not need a device which will become distracting. Are we not placing to much faith in technology?how long before someone sues Nissan because they fell asleep at the wheel & the watch did not tell them they were feeling tired. We are becoming a nanny state where everyone wants everything done for them.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 70.

    Is this like the so called optional driver assessment devices offered by insurance companies. Mr Smith (a shift worker) constantly drives home at 11.30 pm, so he might have been down the pub, and does 33mph in a 30 limit, so that's another 25% on his next renewal.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 69.

    I like the idea in principle, and generally favour technological progress. I just don't see this adding all that much.

 

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