Rural broadband verdict - too little, too late

 
A man on his laptop in the countryside

It always seemed an unlikely ambition - but now we know that Jeremy Hunt's promise that Britain would lead Europe in fast broadband provision by 2015 will not be met. The former culture secretary made the promise back in 2010 when he unveiled the £530m plan to bring fast broadband to rural Britain.

Now the National Audit Office has found that the whole programme is nearly two years behind schedule, so it may be 2017 before we can boast about our tiptop broadband to our European neighbours. What's more, the government's plan to spark a competition between telecoms firms to lay fibre across the country has also proved a failure.

BT will now win every contract, and will end up with a government subsidy of £1.2bn once you throw in the matching funds that every council has had to provide. Now the company may claim, with some justification, that nobody else saw a commercial case in getting involved in rural broadband. But the end result of this very lengthy process has been to squash the competition and make life harder for smaller rivals that could have been more innovative.

Superfast broadband

Ofcom map of Superfast broadband availability

Take, for example, the Isle of Wight. There a company called Wightfibre laid fibre optic cables a decade ago - its investors lost money by betting too early on fast broadband - and now has about 4,000 customers on the island. The Isle of Wight council is about to sign the £6m contract to bring fast broadband to those parts of the island that the market wont reach.

But because of the way the national procurement process was framed, Wightfibre was unable to qualify to compete for that money because the company wasn't big enough to supply other parts of the country. So BT will get the subsidy. And Wightfibre's CEO John Irvine says that will make it even harder for his firm to compete. "I'm not saying: 'Give me that £6m'," says Mr Irvine. "Just don't give it to BT."

The council says, quite understandably, that its job is to make sure that its more far-flung households aren't left on the wrong side of a digital divide, and it has to obey the national rules to get access to the national funds.

The other complaint is about what happens to the final 10%, the very hardest people to reach - though the government is now saying that should only be 5% by 2017. The companies and community groups with ambitions to fill this last gap in the UK's broadband provision say they are in limbo right now because of a lack of information.

They say BT is being secretive for commercial reasons about exactly where its fast services will reach in each county. Until it's known whether the company will actually be laying fibre to Much-Binding-in-the-Marsh, the argument goes, it is impossible for the Much Binding community network to start digging.

A man on a superfast computer in Cornwall

BT, which has been summoned to a rural broadband summit by the current Culture Secretary Maria Miller to discuss this issue, says it can take six to nine months after the signing of a contract to work out exactly which areas will be reached.

Overall, the UK is not doing too badly in fast broadband provision - in the cities at least. Speeds, competition and availability are all on an upward trend.

But that makes it all the more galling for people in many rural areas. They've been promised jam tomorrow - and now they are wondering whether tomorrow will ever come.

 
Rory Cellan-Jones Article written by Rory Cellan-Jones Rory Cellan-Jones Technology correspondent

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  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 92.

    Never mind fibre broadband still waiting for local loop unbundling (LLU)... I wonder how many exchanges have had PlusNet be the first to offer LLU? Very few or none is my guess as BT wholly own it. When I complained to Ofcom it would be against competition rules to make PlusNet do it... But then they compete through PlusNet when someone else offers LLU!

    BT have everyone stitched up. Full stop.

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 91.

    My parents livie in rural Northumberland in a small village - I live 2 miles from a housing estate - they have broadband about 5 times faster than me, so this idea that all rural areas are slow and all urban fast is an er, ... urban myth!

  • rate this
    -1

    Comment number 90.

    Come on. I hate this boring boring country... poor technolgy... time to avoid a combination of school uniform and the death penalty to move to amazing Canada.

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 89.

    I live on the Isle of Wight and just before last Christmas BT contacted me (as a business customer) to say that I would soon be able to receive fast broadband. Never heard another thing from them and now I've found out that only a handful of towns on the island have got it with no plans to expand it anymore. This is not rural fast broadband, not even offering it to the places inbetween towns!

  • rate this
    +2

    Comment number 88.

    British Politicians are full of it. They have no ideas of the real world costs or practicalities

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 87.

    @25 Itsme
    Re originals from London. There are plenty born and bred here. Don't know where you live but where I live plenty were born here. The 3 areas I have lived had a large amount of people born in London. (I have lived outside London as well) In the 30 years I have lived here most of the people I have met were born here including me.

  • rate this
    -1

    Comment number 86.

    I find BT excellent. Live in Exmouh Devon. Have Infinity very fast broadband.

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 85.

    BT really is a rubbish company, Virgin have been laying fibre for years before BT finally realised it was getting left behind & they probably only got in on the act because Sky dumped them.

    Give the contracts regionally with detailed spec to ensure national compatability & let the smaller scale professionals do it properly.

  • rate this
    +4

    Comment number 84.

    Yet again another failure of private enterprise being propped up by the taxpayer. Any chance of the taxpayer getting a proportion of those profits?

  • rate this
    +2

    Comment number 83.

    Blame Doctor Beeching. There is no easy access into a lot of rural locations other than digging the road up, which is costly. A lot of European countries have used existing (and still running) railway lines, by just laying fibre alongside the functioning railway track, they have brought both broadband and mobiles to rural areas, .

  • rate this
    +2

    Comment number 82.

    At least your government has actually tried to do something about getting high speed broadband out to the countryside. Here in the US half the country has limited, expensive and slow internet connections. Even in the cities the coverage in poor areas is woefully slow and spotty. Did anyone expect that BT would not get the lions share, then drag it's feet? Business pays politicians for favors.

  • rate this
    +2

    Comment number 81.

    77.seront
    Yea! How dare people moan that they still can't get broadband. I mean, it's only been about 15 years since they've all been waiting. It's like they think there's been money available to do it...

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 80.

    Wiimax for the countryside. The only problem was BT putting a big monopolistic spoke in the wiimax wheel.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 79.

    The map s do not show a complete accurate picture, for example bedford town has high speed broadband but the rural area surrounding it does not

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 78.

    The scheme is set up against the interests of smaller communities - who are the ones most in need of fibre services. The way small schemes, like that on the IoW are deliberately excluded is a nonsense. Such small scale schemes work very well in other areas but with a smaller coverage requirement. BT are still to publish any plans for many of the more rural shire areas - I'm not holding my breath.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 77.

    Typical of the current British attitude - they want everything now and moan when they cannot have it. Talk about regressing back to childhood. It was always a massive task and apart from the usual problems with large contracts over several years we have had some dire weather since 2010. Remember the snow the floods?

  • rate this
    -1

    Comment number 76.

    BT is an awful company. It just makes me slightly sick. That's all.

  • rate this
    -2

    Comment number 75.

    Madness; giving any more scope to BT possibly the worst organisation in the UK. I would rather the government had announced an anti-BT levy or tax to fund broadband on the grounds that it was worth paying a little bit more to avoid giving any business to the truly awful monopoly that is BT. The mere mention of BT fills me with despair and a sense of deep depression.

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 74.

    17.HG


    Exactly - currently in rural Devon if you want to run a business with any on line trading and/or advertising then you have to stump up the cost of employing a web developer in a city somewhere who can upload images onto your website.

    One low res thumbnail for say eBay takes several hours to upload.....

  • rate this
    +4

    Comment number 73.

    I wonder if Openreach had been sold off to Deutsche Telekom AG the UK would have faired any better?

 

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