Amazon advances with Autorip - who can compete?

 
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Where and how do you buy music these days?

If it's a CD or vinyl, you've a choice between a high street store or an online retailer like Amazon. If it's a digital download, you're most likely to be buying it from iTunes.

Now Amazon is launching a service designed to make it a one-stop shop for physical and digital music products. And that raises the question - why on earth have its rivals sat and watched this happen?

Amazon's new AutoRip service means that whenever you buy a CD or a vinyl album you also get free mp3 versions. What is more, customers who have bought physical music from the online retailer in the past will find that it is now all available in digital form in Amazon's CloudPlayer.

This could be rather scary - Amazon started selling CDs in the UK back in 1999, and you may find the evidence of your past musical tastes rather distressing.

But how attractive will this feature really be? You might think most music fans were rapidly abandoning CDs for digital downloads, so that this kind of hybrid service would soon be irrelevant.

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The incumbents in industries threatened by digital disruption have gone through a cycle of complacency followed by mild concern and then panic”

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Paul Firth, head of music for Amazon UK, tells me he's confident there is a large body of consumers for whom Autorip will be attractive. The company still shifts a lot of CDs, and the sales are growing in the UK, which means that it has a growing share of a shrinking market.

In the US, where the service has been live since January, it has helped grow sales - those CDs which are licensed for Autorip are selling faster than those that aren't.

"It gives us a better customer offer," says Mr Firth."We're uniquely placed to offer people the chance to listen to what they want across both physical and digital."

So an American business which is already the dominant force in book retailing in the UK, both physical and digital, is now bidding to carve out a big slice of the music market too. Of course another American firm, Apple, will have plenty to say about that - but it's worth asking why no British retailer is in the running.

We have some of the world's most successful artists, and a great music culture , but we've failed to develop a company that could adapt to the digital age and rival Apple and Amazon in the business of selling music to consumers.

There was one obvious candidate. Back in the mid-90s when Amazon got underway, this UK firm was a retail powerhouse, selling music, videos and books, and with ties to a major music label.

It continued to grow into the next decade, and while it was somewhat slow to spot the threat from digital competition, it did then launch a major drive to modernise the way it engaged with consumers, as explained in the company's 2008 Annual Report: "As digital delivery becomes a reality across a wider range of our product categories," it said, "we are now poised to grow faster."

That company was HMV, which went into administration in January this year. Sadly its various efforts at selling music online or offering downloads with physical purchases to selected customers were too little, too late, and never added up to a coherent digital strategy.

HMV Oxford Street HMV - a wasted opportunity?

For too long, the company focussed on holding on to what it had - a profitable high street operation - rather than advancing onto new territory. Of course, in that HMV is far from alone.

Worldwide, the incumbents in all kinds of industries threatened by digital disruption have gone through a cycle of complacency followed by mild concern and then panic - look at Kodak and its reaction to digital photography.

And some would point to another reason why American web giants can prosper at the expense of home-grown businesses. Amazon, as we've all heard recently, is among those companies making use of perfectly legal tax avoidance measures to reduce its corporation tax payments to just £2.4m last year.

Independent bookshops are already angry about competition from a firm they see as enjoying an unfair advantage. Now the UK's remaining record stores - including HMV's new owners - face a rival who can offer consumers CDs, vinyl and downloads all in one package at a very keen price. Music fans may still have a sentimental attachment to the record stores - but who would bet against them spending their money with Amazon?

 
Rory Cellan-Jones Article written by Rory Cellan-Jones Rory Cellan-Jones Technology correspondent

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  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 342.

    340.bonou2vox
    1 Hour ago
    This conversation makes me want to dig out my vinyls my dad gave me as i still have an old technics player and some david bowie lps and im 36 so it is cool to listen to vinyls just dont know if the vinyls are better as they have that annoying crackle probably dust on the needle :)

    +++

    For me it's my Texan amp., SME arm on Sugden deck.

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 341.

    339.Ian K
    3 Hours ago
    If he is that interested in understanding how things work I suggest he finds out for himself. Am not at beck and call.

    +++

    Curtains knows how things work, that's why he doesn't believe that 5micron detail can be resolved by a 28micron radius stylus. We see that Ian K doesn't address that fundamental issue.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 340.

    This conversation makes me want to dig out my vinyls my dad gave me as i still have an old technics player and some david bowie lps and im 36 so it is cool to listen to vinyls just dont know if the vinyls are better as they have that annoying crackle probably dust on the needle :)

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 339.

    336. phrhs
    3 HOURS AGO
    Ian K and CURTAINS 2012 - I think it is past your bed time.
    ++++
    LOL It was past it a long time ago. :o)
    Curtains 2012 seems to think he has the right to demand answers from me whilst ignoring any question I set. I'm done, he needs to learn some manners. If he is that interested in understanding how things work I suggest he finds out for himself. Am not at beck and call.

  • Comment number 338.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • rate this
    +2

    Comment number 337.

    336.phrhs
    22 Minutes ago
    Ian K and CURTAINS 2012 - I think it is past your bed time.


    +++

    LOL

    I'll see if I can find the pee under the mattress and tell the queen off if I find it.

  • rate this
    +4

    Comment number 336.

    Ian K and CURTAINS 2012 - I think it is past your bed time.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 335.

    Given the superiority of tape over using a spike to try to track bumps, perhaps that could be the next thing for the linear purists.

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 334.

    332.Ian K
    16 Minutes ago
    I understand linear & oversampled conversion at different bit rates, upsampling & interpolation and so on, well enough

    I have answered your questions, you have ignored mine.

    +++

    You've still not explained how the tip of a stylus 28 micron radius can follow 5micron pitch (100kHz) signals in the groove. That's simple mechanics.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 333.

    330. CURTAINS 2012: "So, you don't know what method your box uses to make the CD signal acceptable to you?"
    +++
    One last point. I never said it made it acceptable, just that it sounded better than the original CD. If it sounded acceptable I wouldn't be bothering with vinyl or hi-res audio would I?
    But, enough. This thread is about Amazon and HMV. Amazon got innovative, HMV will get dead, I reckon.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 332.

    330. CURTAINS 2012: "So, you don't know what method your box uses to make the CD signal acceptable to you?"
    +++
    Enough. You clearly don't understand/aren't reading what I'm saying. I understand linear & oversampled conversion at different bit rates, upsampling & interpolation and so on, well enough. Have done since it started in the early 80s.
    I have answered your questions, you have ignored mine.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 331.

    The reason vinyl sometimes sounds better than CD is probably simply that modern CD sound is highly compressed as part of the loudness war leading to lack of dynamic range and impact of soft to loud sounds within the track.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 330.

    329.Ian K
    Am not here to provide tutorials. It does for audio what it does for image improvement and video improvement. If you have written software, then you know what it does, surely?
    but to help... http://www.alpha-ii.com/Info/AudioInt.html

    +++

    So, you don't know what method your box uses to make the CD signal acceptable to you?

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 329.

    328. CURTAINS 2012: Aid my understanding by explaining the interpoaltion process. I've written interpolation software, so tell me how it improves the signal.
    +++
    Am not here to provide tutorials. It does for audio what it does for image improvement and video improvement. If you have written software, then you know what it does, surely?
    but to help... http://www.alpha-ii.com/Info/AudioInt.html

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 328.

    327.Ian K
    1 Minute ago
    As for streaming, you rip in digital and then stream using upsampling. Think you need to update your understanding.

    +++

    Aid my understanding by explaining the interpoaltion process. I've written interpolation software, so tell me how it improves the signal.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 327.

    323. CURTAINS 2012: "I can see that the vinyl is derived from the master, but the route to the other versions is not given."

    +++
    You're grasping at straws. John Wood, who mastered the original, was in charge of the new releases. He did a great job on all formats, with equal care.
    As for streaming, you rip in digital and then stream using upsampling. Think you need to update your understanding.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 326.

    This is a great new option from Amazon, but there are some anomalies. You can buy a CD with the free Autorip download cheaper than you can by the MP3 download on its own. e.g. Alfie Boe CD £4.99 with free Autorip MP3. Alfie Boe MP3 album £7.49. So its £2.50 cheaper to buy the CD/Autorip/MP3 with free postage than just the buying the MP3 album. That makes no sense at all.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 325.

    MP3 files for CDs I bought as Christmas presents for someone else are available, even though I sent them as a gift. I doubt the record companies would be too happy with that.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 324.

    321. CURTAINS 2012
    Are you claiming accuracy because you are paying extra for it?

    ++++

    Don't be daft. A third of my vinyl is new, 180 gramme stuff. Is expensive, yes. Rest are originals, bought secondhand, most for £2-7. Rarities more expensive. Best sounding albums are originals, without question, sound stunning. We lost a lot when we lost vinyl, most people have never heard it at all.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 323.

    322.Ian K
    6 Minutes ago
    And you get a 96K/24bit FLAC straight from the master tape too. So I can compare them, & the standard CD, & the SACD which I also have. Vinyl/FLAC very similar, SACD OK, CD behind. No question.
    http://www.brytermusic.com/pink-moon-turns-40/

    +++

    I can see that the vinyl is derived from the master, but the route to the other versions is not given.

 

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