EU proposes new cybercrime reporting rules

 
European cybercrime centre A European cybercrime centre was opened in The Hague last month

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Over 40,000 firms, including energy providers, banks and hospitals could be required to report cyber-break-ins under new rules proposed by the EU.

It is part of a move to intensify global efforts to fight cybercrime.

Digital agenda commissioner Neelie Kroes said that Europe needed to improve how it dealt with cybersecurity.

But firms are concerned that reporting online attacks and security breaches might damage their reputations.

Many breaches

The EU is keen that member states share information about attacks and shore up their cyber-defences.

Under the proposals, each country would have to appoint a Computer Emergency Response Team and create an authority to whom companies would report breaches.

These new bodies would decide whether to make the breaches public and whether to fine companies.

Announcing the changes, Ms Kroes said: "Europe needs resilient networks and systems and failing to act would would impose significant costs on consumers, businesses and society."

According to the EU, only one in four European companies has a regularly-reviewed, formal ICT security policy. Even among ICT companies, the figure is only one in two, it said.

A recent study by accountants PwC suggested that three quarters of UK small businesses, and 93% of large ones, had recently suffered a cybersecurity breach.

 

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  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 123.

    Hopefully this will include the MOD For the second time the Queens Harbourmasters computer systems have been compromised. The e-mail addresses and passwords of all subscribers to their Notices to Mariners have been accessed and put live on a website. Change all passwords again - thanks MOD QMH. This does not appear to have been reported very widely. Come on DT, get your teeth into this!

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 122.

    Schools and other public bodies should move away from Windows systems. Insecure,expensive systems should be replaced with open source systems. Billions have already been wasted by Govt on expensive licensed software which does not deliver on security. How much is our national infrastructure getting ready to spend on updating Windows & Office ?

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 121.

    ABOUT DAMNED TIME!

    The vast majority of breakins are a result of exploits of vulnerabilities over 2 years old or a result of zero/default passwords not being changed - It would help if insurance companies voided policies for negligence.

    A number of companies I know of, have actively covered up breakins that obtained personal data. This kind of behaviour should lead to criminal prosecution.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 120.

    Suppose we have to pay for this as well

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 119.

    This proposal seems innocuous enough, but read this before stampeding to adopt it:

    http://docs.house.gov/meetings/IF/IF16/20130205/100221/HHRG-113-IF16-Wstate-McDowellR-20130205.pdf

    More internet regulation and supervision is not what's needed; what's needed is a practical awareness of security risks and an intelligent response to them. It isn't someone else's problem, it's yours...

  • rate this
    -1

    Comment number 118.

    Oh... is an EU proposal? Sorry I forgot to steer off-topic and use this space to rant at the unaccountable mandarins none of you bothered turning out to elect.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 117.

    The internet is a wonderful communication tool. However in the wrong hands, it could exacerbate'cyber crime. Fighting the menace has become a top priority of European institutions, multinational companies. The internet is a remarkable twenty-first century invention with far-reaching effects on speed, efficiency and profitability. This god-send will have to be protected zealously.Tricky pass-words?

  • rate this
    +2

    Comment number 116.

    I don't imagine too many bosses will be forthcoming with reports of their systems being compromised - when they themselves caused it by:
    * browsing _off-topic_ while at work,
    * using company email to propagate personal emails
    * failing to supervise staff's computer use and then treating them like disposable resources
    * got the job in the first place by misleading interviewers on their IT literacy.

  • rate this
    +4

    Comment number 115.

    All this does is increase red tape and bureaucracy and will do nothing to solve the number one cause of security flaws in any network, users. Any measure you take to make life easier for users compromises security a bit and then you have downright incompetence of people keeping default passwords of leaving passwords laying around. That happens a lot.

  • rate this
    +4

    Comment number 114.

    Considering that goverments have such a great track record when it comes to large computer projects, I can see this being a huge success. As long as the department head doesn't leave their laptop on the train again.

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 113.

    More red tape, do the EU even like business by any chance. How is any poor sod suppose to set up their own business and make something of themselves.

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 112.

    And what will the good ol` EU DO with the information?
    Discuss it in depth on a massive Committee?
    Set up yet ANOTHER massive bureaucracy?
    Write MORE REAMS of incomprehensible regulations.
    How about those suffering cyber attacks call their local police and wait 8 weeks for them to send someone round, then find she doesn`t know about Computers?

  • rate this
    +3

    Comment number 111.

    @105.Ellis Birt

    "The country would be in chaos."

    What kind of idiot connects vital infrastructure hardware to the Internet? Oh, that's right, our government

    *slaps own forhead*

  • rate this
    +4

    Comment number 110.

    Does this include punishment for governments and their affilates that eaves-drop on innocent web-users?

  • rate this
    -2

    Comment number 109.

    I am cybercrime expert say why they do people may ask send me your money scam or their bank scam. PLEASE DO NOT ASK YOUR BANK DETAIL OR DEBIT/CREDIT CARD FRAUD ONLINE ANYTHING.

  • rate this
    +4

    Comment number 108.

    From what I've seen, most hacking isn't people stealing other people's money but people reacting with moral outrage towards the actions of various governments. No wonder the EU want to prevent it. As far as I'm concerned, the hackers are the good guys here.

  • rate this
    +3

    Comment number 107.

    The EU are probably terrified that someone will hack their accounts and show the world how corrupt they are with our money!

  • rate this
    -3

    Comment number 106.

    No Vote UKIP comments ? UKIP can solve every problem, they will cut off the internet.

  • rate this
    -4

    Comment number 105.

    34. wibble575

    However, it is for Governments to ensure that the largest businesses in their economy are not about to collapse, causing havoc.

    What would happen if National Grid were hacked and could not control Electricity and Gas supplies, or a major supermarket or One of the major banks?

    The country would be in chaos.

  • rate this
    +4

    Comment number 104.

    UK privacy laws are feeble. The reports came out citing MI5's desire to install black boxes at Internet providers to deep-scan all web traffic just shows that despite the government "rethink" on the communications bill, they have not actually listened to the public and plan on going ahead with their Orwellian nightmare.

 

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