Nokia’s Symbian surprise

 

Rory Cellan-Jones takes a look at the Nokia 808 Pureview

Last year Nokia's Stephen Elop flung his company off what he described as a burning platform, putting the Finnish giant's Symbian operating system out to grass to get into bed with Microsoft's Windows Phone. But on Monday morning he appeared to leap straight back on the platform.

The new Nokia 808 PureView seems to be an astonishing beast, a cameraphone with a 41 megapixel lens. We know that more megapixels do not mean a lot if the technology behind it - notably the sensor - isn't up to much. But Nokia has been showing off images shot on the phone blown up to poster size, and they look pretty good. What's more, it shoots in full 1080p HD video, so with one of these rather hefty handsets in your pocket, you should have everything you need to shoot quality images on the move.

But just a moment. The 808 is a Symbian handset, and with a hefty price tag is not aimed at the developing world. With Symbian's share of the smartphone market plummeting by the day - it had dipped below 12% last time I looked - and all of Nokia's marketing efforts aimed at its range of Lumia Windows phones, the 808 won't be at the top of many people's shopping lists.

In fact, the phone - for all its high-end technology - feels like a solidly made Nokia from about five years ago. Back then it would have sold by the million. Now the world has moved on and smartphone photography is all about apps, which won't be developed for the Symbian platform.

Pic taken by Nokia boss with the new 41MP cameraphone The "uncomfortably close" photo of Rory

When I met Elop here in Barcelona at the Mobile World Congress, he immediately whipped out the PureView phone, took a picture of me, and zoomed in uncomfortably close to show how much detail the phone could record in an image.

When I asked why it was on Symbian, not Windows Phone, I got no very satisfactory answer, except that the team behind the technology had been working on it for five years, and it would come to the Lumia range later.

We quickly moved on to discuss what progress had been made since last autumn's launch of the Nokia Windows phones. He was keen to tell me that the first Lumia handset in the United States was "exceeding expectations". Without detailed figures it's hard to know whether Nokia is making any headway from a standing start in persuading consumers that there's more to smartphones than Apple or Android.

Stephen Elop in front of a blown-up photo of a woman Stephen Elop with a photo taken on the new phone

But in the UK a good source tells me, for all the expensive marketing which accompanied the launch of the Lumia 800, Nokia managed to sell 10,000 a week compared with 130,000 for Apple's iPhone 4S.

Elop remains confident - and quite convincing - in his belief that there is room in the market for a third "ecosystem" to rival Apple and Android's integrated worlds.

That makes it all the harder to understand why the most eye-catching Nokia announcement in Barcelona is about a Symbian phone.

But maybe it's a move driven by sentiment - after all, it was engineers building on the Symbian platform who made Nokia a hugely powerful force in smartphones until the iPhone came along. Many of them are now leaving the business. Perhaps the TrueView is an acknowledgement of everything they contributed over the years when the Finnish firm was on top.

 
Rory Cellan-Jones Article written by Rory Cellan-Jones Rory Cellan-Jones Technology correspondent

Game on - e-sports takes off in the UK

Video game competitions, watched by audiences in stadiums and on TV, are taking off in Britain.

Read full article

More on This Story

More from Rory

Comments

This entry is now closed for comments

Jump to comments pagination
 
  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 24.

    As #6 (pwest) points out, the 41MP headline is misleading at best - even on SLRs (with big much better quality lenses) the limiting factor for sharpness at these kind of resolutions is the lens, diffraction etc, so don't throw your SLR away just yet....

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 23.

    @Tom: The sensor has been increased. It's now about the size of Nikon 1 (ie DSLR sized).

    The 34 or 38MP image (from the 41MP sensor) is then pixel-binned (or oversampled) to produce (in default mode) a 5MP image with almost NO noise, extremely good low-light performance & of a manageable size.

    Check out DPReview for photogs opinion of this groundbreaking cameraphone. http://is.gd/7kJhQD

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 22.

    >Symbian is in fact the most advanced mobile OS on the planet,

    With the least advanced user interface. Making a call on a Symbian phone tended to mean about 4 button presses. Open address book, click contact, click call and then select between voice and video call. Diabolical usability that is at least 5 years out of date.

    Nokia were too late to embrace touch screens, they could have bought UIQ.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 21.

    It would be exciting if this was created by a camera company. But it's from Nokia who's products have been quite buggy and poor for a while now.

    It's not fun to have to pull out the battery from your phone to stop the speakerphone automatically activating and blasting your (potentially private) phone call across the office.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 20.

    Chinese phone claims to be the world's fastest & another that carries an in-built projector. Nokia - already a giant in Mobile Tech. unveiled this phone with a powerful 41 Megapixel camera as it attempts to reposition itself back at the forefront of the mobile market. And this phone seems destined to become another "must have" toy for the "mobility" (Mobs that must have latest gimmicks.).

 

Comments 5 of 24

 

Features

  • PlanesTest of nerve

    WW1 fighter pilots who navigated using a school atlas


  • Pauline Borghese What the butler saw

    Scandalous tales from the British embassy in Paris


  • A baby holds an adult's fingerSmall Data

    The time when the average age of death was zero


  • League of LegendsBattle for glory

    On the ground at League of Legends World Championship's final


  • Vinyl record pressing in AustraliaVinyl vibe

    Getting into the groove with Australia's last record maker


BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.