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Balloon photography reveals the atmosphere's secrets

20 May 2014 Last updated at 10:29 BST

The stratosphere lies at an altitude of about 10km - 50km (6 miles - 30 miles) and is one of the least studied parts of the atmosphere. It is too high for aircraft and too low for satellites.

But cheap electronics are now allowing amateur high altitude ballooners to get involved and send payloads into the sky to collect scientific data.

BBC Weather presenter Peter Gibbs went to Malawi in east Africa to send a weather balloon into the air with some simple technology to take readings from the edge of space. But will be be able to find and recover all the data after the balloon bursts and falls back to earth?

Extreme photography revealing the atmosphere's secrets.

Watch more clips on the Click website. If you are in the UK you can watch the whole programme on BBC iPlayer.

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