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Bullfighting ban: Your reaction

28 July 10 15:23
Spanish matador David Fandilla, "El Fandi" makes a pass at the Monumental bullring in Barcelona, Spain, Sunday, July 25, 2010.

Catalonia has voted to ban bullfighting - the first region of mainland Spain to do so.

The vote took place after a petition was brought to parliament, signed by 180,000 people who say the practice is barbaric and outdated.

Here, readers in Catalonia and the rest of Spain react to the ban.

In favour of ban

Maria Jesus Perez Santos, Madrid

My family and I feel ashamed by this cruel treatment to animals. For us, it will be a great day if this horrible "tradition" disappears today.

Most of the Spanish population are sensitive to animal rights and for many years have been fighting against cruelty.

But up to now, the state was ignoring our votes, protestations and opinions.

We are from Madrid, and we desired with all our hearts that the Catalan parliament would vote for a ban.

Congratulations Catalonia. I feel better to be Spanish today.

Esther Ruiz i Buendia, Barcelona

I totally agree with this ban.

Lots of people say this ruling has come about because Catalans do not want to seem Spanish.

This is a lie: bullfighting is Catalan, Andalucian, and Castilian. But there aren't any reasons to preserve it.

Is it nice to see a bull vomiting its own blood? To cry out when the "picador" stabs the animal?

Violence has to be forbidden, because if you want "fiestas" with bulls (or small cows), you can have lots of them without torturing and killing this poor and beautiful animal.

I am proud of my Parlament with this ban.

Llus Del Cerro, Barcelona

I absolutely agree with the decision to ban these cruel shows which are a Spanish, not Catalan, tradition, although there may be a few supporters here in Catalonia.

The people who attend these are mostly tourists, who more than likely never want to see another one again.

The Spaniards may take it as a Catalan political statement, but those Spaniards do not acknowledge that this cruel practice was prohibited in the Canary Islands in 1991 and there was no adverse reaction then.

They will surely use this against Catalonia once again.

Francisco, Malaga

I agree 200% with the ban, which represents the victory of reason and compassion over the cruelty and intransigence when it comes to spectacles where animals are senselessly tortured and killed.

Today all compassionate people in Spain and elsewhere must feel as Catalan and satisfied with their democratic vote against such spectacles as I do.

And likewise, the day bullfights are finally abolished in the rest of Spain, which will come sooner than many think, the majority of Catalans and all compassionate people will equally cheer the long awaited end of such an unacceptable form of institutionalised depravity.

Miguel Strubell, Barcelona, Catalonia

All credit to these Catalan MPs.

Bullfighting is utterly barbaric. Bulls are tortured, and people pay to watch.

This blood sport is a relic of an uncivilised past, and should follow the way of cock fights and fox hunting.

Opposed to ban

Montserrat Igual, Barcelona

I am against bullfights, but I don't agree with the decision to ban it. I am Catalan and bullfight rings are open just for a few Spaniards and tourists.

This "fiesta" will disappear in Catalonia by itself. There is no need for a ban.

It is not true that this ban has been introduced because we Catalans want to be different than the rest of Spain.

Of course we are different but we don't like bullfights because we can't stand to see an animal suffering on such a level.

Steve Gould, Murcia

This is yet another step on the sad road to a global homogenised society.

I relocated to inland Murcia about six years ago, to a tiny agricultural town with a bullring. Through getting to know the people I became aware of the relationship that the Spanish country folk have with animals and death.

From childhood they regard animals as belonging to a realm that they are in control of. The bullfight is the ultimate expression of that domination over nature.

Whereas I was previously a pet loving anti-cruelty maniac, now I understand a little more about the old Spanish way of life.

Bullfighting will die out I'm sure, not because society is becoming more civilised, but because it's easier for everyone to buy into sanitised off-the-shelf lifestyle.

Javier, Barcelona

Personally I've always been against bullfighting. I consider that watching a helpless animal suffer torture is barbarous and cruel.

But here in Catalonia prohibition seems the only way politicians can cope with problems.

This is what annoys me most of all - prohibit, forbid, ban are all verbs which have found their place in our society.

Where's the personal liberty to decide freely?

Veronica, Barcelona

I personally do not like bullfighting, since I am a vegetarian.

But in this society where vegetarianism is not part of our culture, I find it hypocritical to be against this tradition.

These bulls are raised for the purpose of bullfighting.

They wouldn't exist if the bullfights stop.

They have a great life on the land and die bravely in the arena, instead of living in a box, growing on hormones, and dying one year later by electro-shock.

Jesus Ayala, Pamplona

Bullfighting is a great tradition in Spain.

It is one of the things that puts us on the map in Europe.

It is like we have sold ourselves out with this ban.

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