Media playback is unsupported on your device

Sega v Nintendo: the console war that changed the video game industry

13 May 2014 Last updated at 00:08 BST

The battle between video game giant Nintendo and upstart Sega arguably laid the foundation for the future of the video game industry.

In the late 1980s, Nintendo, a Japanese company, revived the video game industry in the United States after a crash wrecked Atari's prospects and other companies were turning away from console games.

By 1990, Nintendo had a virtual monopoly on the industry with popular games like Donkey Kong and Super Mario.

Sega, another Japanese company that had tried - and failed - to compete effectively with Nintendo in the past, was determined to overtake the video game giant.

It hoped its new mascot, Sonic the Hedgehog, with his speed and attitude, was the Mario killer it was looking for, says Blake J Harris, author of the new book Console Wars.

He told the BBC that Sega's philosophy and marketing changed the industry and proved that video games were not just for kids.

Produced by Ashley Semler and David Botti; filmed by Anna Bressanin

Living Online is a series of video features published every Tuesday on the BBC News website which look at how technology converges with culture and all aspects of our daily lives.

BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.