Your unusual town names

Sign-post including the name 'Hole'

The towns Dull in Perthshire, UK and Boring in Oregon, US recently paired up in a drive to improve tourism. In response the Magazine asked people for their pictures and recollections of unusually named towns. Here is a selection.

Thomas Holden, who took the picture above, writes: My wife and I were taking a short break in Devon and we were paying a visit to Bere Ferrers which is a tiny village I'd noticed on a map. The road to Hole is off the route to Bere Ferrers and I just had to take a photo. I think the name comes from the fact the road plunges down almost as though into a hole.

Sign-post including the name 'Piles'

Piles, Karpathos, Greece

Andrew Jennings, who took this picture,writes: Whilst on holiday in Greece in 2008 on the island of Karpathos we came across this rather painful sounding town.

Sign of the town Accident in Maryland, US

Accident in Maryland, US

Cathy Cook from Ballydehob in Ireland asks: Is it time that Accident, Maryland, US was paired with Hospital, Co Limerick, Ireland?

Sign of the town Pratts Bottom

Pratts Bottom, Kent, UK

Roger Storer says: Pratts Bottom is very near Badgers Mount. Both in Kent. I lived in the dull sounding town of West Kingsdown - so every time I drove passed these they gave me a huge snigger. I dread to think what they could be twinned with.

David in Orpinton, Kent writes: I live near Pratts Bottom. I notice that the small green signs indicating the name of this village have recently vanished, which is rather a shame, since it would be nice for travellers to know when they enter and exit Pratts Bottom. Not far away is the village of Badgers Mount.

Sign of the town Ugley in Essex, UK

Ugley in Essex, UK has proven memorable to Magazine readers

Gavin Collins says: The village of Ugley has a peculiar name, but is actually very pretty and is set in a very scenic part of Essex. There is rumoured to be a branch of the Women's Institute in Ugley, but I think this may be a myth. However, I have seen the Ugley Village Hall, but contrary to expectations, it is a handsome building with fine garden.

Shoshana Hantman in New York, US says: What about the village of Ugley, in Essex? Close by is Ugley Green. I have long desired to become a member of the Ugley Women's Institute.

Peter Turner in Bishop's Stortford writes: Nearby are the villages of Ugley and Nasty. Not so long ago the local paper was able to use the headline Ugley woman marries Nasty man.

Sign for the town Les Arses in Switzerland

Les Arses in Switzerland

Andrew Allshire, who took this picture, suggests that this town in Switzerland might work well for a Father Ted reunion.

Sign for the town Lost in Scotland

Lost in Aberdeenshire, Scotland

Iain Wright says: There must be some potential for twinning 'Lost' in Aberdeenshire with 'No Name' in Garfield County, Colorado. Both are tiny hamlets, each with less than a hundred population. And I've been to both.

More of your choices:

Jan Pearce in Grantham, UK writes: Is it easier to sleep in Little Snoring or Great Snoring, Norfolk?

Steve Millar in Falkirk, Scotland writes: Not so much an embarrassing name, but not too far from here is a village called Crook of Devon. Years ago, somebody put a sign below it saying: "Twinned with the Thief of Baghdad." Pity that someone took it down, no sense of humour.

Paul Wilson in Goxhill, North Lincolnshire writes: Story recollected of old from my late father regarding two Lincolnshire villages. A signpost gave directions: To Mavis Enderby and Old Bolingbroke. To which had been added "A son, both doing well."

Mary Arneson in Minnesota, US writes: We once drove several miles northwest of Linz, Austria just to see the town sign for Rottenegg.

Features

BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.