NHS bosses ponder hospital hotels to ease ward pressure

 
Nurse giving patient medicine A patient hotel system would take the strain off hospital wards

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Plans for hospital hotels to care for patients who no longer need 24-hour medical care are being considered by NHS managers.

Under the proposals, patients such as the elderly waiting to be discharged, new mothers and stroke patients would recover in hotel-style facilities.

The idea is being reviewed by the new commissioning body, NHS England.

Supporters say the scheme, based on a Scandinavian model, would ease demand on hospital beds.

Patient hotels are common in Scandinavia, especially in Sweden and Norway.

They cater for patients who do not need to be on an inpatient ward, such as couples staying overnight after the birth of a baby or recovering stroke patients.

As well as offering more freedom for patients, the buildings are designed to save money, since a hotel room is cheaper than the price of a hospital bed.

The issue has been investigated by Baroness Greengross, a cross-bench peer.

Start Quote

The patient hotel concept offers advantages to some types of patient...But it may not be appropriate for all patients, and it is important to ensure that it is used only where most clinically and cost effective.”

End Quote Candace Imison The King's Fund

A Department of Health spokeswoman said: "Proposals for health hotels were submitted to the department by Baroness Greengross. Ministers have forwarded the proposals to NHS England so they can review them."

NHS England is the new body responsible for overseeing the commissioning of services by local doctors.

An estimated 30,000 patients each year are kept in hospital despite being well enough to be discharged.

They include elderly patients waiting for a place in a nursing home or those with dementia.

Some UK hospitals already provide accommodation for patients who need to stay close to hospital premises but do not need constant medical care.

University College London Hospitals (UCLH) provides hotel rooms where patients, such as those needing daily cancer treatment, can stay with relatives near to the hospital.

UCLH says the cost, which is paid for by the NHS, is cheaper than 24-hour hospital care.

According to figures from 2010, the cost of keeping a patient in a hospital bed overnight is more than £300 compared with around half that for a hotel room.

Commenting on the proposals, Candace Imison, The King's Fund's deputy director of policy, said:

"The patient hotel concept offers advantages to some types of patient, such as those who receive cancer treatment a long distance from home.

"But it may not be appropriate for all patients, and it is important to ensure that it is used only where most clinically and cost effective."

 

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  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 253.

    247.michellegrand
    246.riff77
    ==============
    From the first paragraph:
    ""patients who no longer need 24-hour medical care""


    If they do not need medical aid they do not belong in hospital.

  • Comment number 252.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 251.

    This sounds a good way to get people back home quickly.
    A hotel with hospital food would be empty and closed within a month.

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 250.

    From Wiki PFI page:

    In September 1997 [Tony Blair, Labour] guaranteed PFI payments even if it meant beds, doctors, nurses and managers could be sacrificed,

    http://www.parliament.the-stationery-office.co.uk/pa/cm200102/cmselect/cmhealth/308/30806.htm
    The Medical Practitioners' Union told us that PFI projects were "poor value for money, led to less beds and staff and to cramped, poorer premises".

  • rate this
    +2

    Comment number 249.

    "44.Nerd Pride
    10 Hours ago
    If you believe the NHS should remain state-run, do not vote Tory or Lib Dem in 2015"

    And you think the Labour party have any ideas?? Think on and look at all the PFI commitments the NHS has. P = Private. Think about it, before you give me a negative vote.

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 248.

    So on of the flaws is NHS and LA arguing over who should pay? Put it all on the NHS then. Perhaps getting rid of some NHS paper pushers (not being cut back like the nurses, i believe) might make the figures look better

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 247.

    245.Companion
    Bed and Breakfast entrepreneurs where one can get a good nights sleep for £29=00 inclusive of morning meal.
    NOT the Old Peoples Homes that charge £400 (or more) per week.

    People OK to go to a B&B and look after themselves wouldn't need to go to Old People Homes.
    Perhaps someone who knows can show the figures for running old people's homes?

  • rate this
    +2

    Comment number 246.

    @245 Companion

    Most OAP care homes are also run by "entrepreneurs", I doubt many of them provide convalescent care for £29 a night. But why let reason get in the way of a fatuous and irrelevant public vs private argument, right?

  • rate this
    -2

    Comment number 245.

    If there is one thing certain... a private company would be able to run such an enterprise at a profit with much less fuss than any UK government.

    Bed and Breakfast entrepreneurs where one can get a good nights sleep for £29=00 inclusive of morning meal.
    NOT the Old Peoples Homes that charge £400 (or more) per week.

  • rate this
    +3

    Comment number 244.

    If we go back far enough (and be old enough to remember) the basics of our lives, the infrastructure; schools, hospitals, convalescent and maternity homes, railways, bus services, local authorities, gas, electric and water were all there and with there recognised failings we all could rely upon.

    Now we have a country where most of this has been sold off for profit or disbanded and closed down.

  • rate this
    -3

    Comment number 243.

    The NHS is responsible for patents getting treatment and care for ailments.

    With an ageing population, the elderly although fit for release, take up bed space due to lack of accommodation.

    It is a City Council's responsibility to care for the people within its catchment NOT the NHS if the (recovered) patient needs accommodating.

    NB Hospitals built under PFI (allegedly) have many less beds.

  • rate this
    +5

    Comment number 242.

    They used to be called convalesent homes I believe. New policy hey?

  • rate this
    +2

    Comment number 241.

    No doubt a good idea although not a new one. However the British just seem to make a mess of everything that involves patient care. It's all so easy but no doubt it will be so hard to deliver because of bureaucracy, red tape, money, just everything will go to pieces and nothing will be done about it...meanwhile just carry on as normal with patients blocking beds, although not their fault.

  • rate this
    +2

    Comment number 240.

    @218. Skywatchman
    >>We have to ask ourselves and our government how can other countries offer and deliver the same if not better clinical care as our NHS but without bankrupting their budgets?

    In such an activity we would find it quite instructive to look at pay levels for senior doctors and the extent to which they are allowed to veto genuine change.

  • rate this
    +2

    Comment number 239.

    234.Soothseeker
    "Because NHS and Social Services budgets are separate. Social services delay accepting NHS patients into their care because the costs immediately hit their budget. So let's invent another tier - 'hotels'. Make it a three way fight instead of two"
    ===
    You may shudder at more public sector workers but the only way to resolve this dilemma is to have one organisation and not three.

  • rate this
    +5

    Comment number 238.

    Watered down version of this already exist, 'intermediate care beds' in residential homes. And already it's a bureaucratic nightmare, endless arguments about patients being funded by health or social care and who is going to fund long term care, to name a couple.

    The process needs to be taken out of Tory hands

  • rate this
    +3

    Comment number 237.

    return to comvslescent homes again ,about time to it will take some pressure from the hospitals ,and stop bed blocking ,

  • rate this
    -4

    Comment number 236.

    There isn't a solution for the health service. We are bankrupt and we cannot afford to make it better. In fact things will probably get worse. Our economy is on a downward slope. We shall soon be a third world country. Like all empires we shall fall. Then see what kind of health service we can afford!! A very basic one at best I am afraid.

  • rate this
    +5

    Comment number 235.

    Convalescent homes and many cottage hospitals were got rid of by the Torys in the 80's. How wonderfully predictable of the current dross from the Shires.

  • rate this
    -1

    Comment number 234.

    "An estimated 30,000 patients each year are kept in hospital despite being well enough to be discharged"

    Because NHS and Social Services budgets are separate. Social services delay accepting NHS patients into their care because the costs immediately hit their budget. So let's invent another tier - 'hotels'. Make it a three way fight instead of two. More public sector jobs and pensions. Perfect.

 

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