'Stoptober' stop-smoking campaign launched in England

 
Stoptober ad The Stoptober wheel will travel the country so people can sign it and pledge to quit

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Smokers across England are being urged to quit for a month in a government campaign.

Research has shown that people who manage to stop smoking for that length of time are more likely not to start again.

"Stoptober" takes place for 28 days from 1 October.

England's Chief Medical Officer Professor Dame Sally Davies said it was the first time that the government had launched a "mass quit attempt".

The campaign will involve TV and radio advertising, a daily messaging service and roadshows around the country. There is also a Stoptober app and a Facebook page.

Health Minister Norman Lamb, who said he quit smoking last week, told BBC Breakfast the campaign was "a good investment in health promotion".

"I think it's well worth trying this approach," he said.

"And if we can get people working locally together collectively to give up we can have a real impact."

'Social animals'

Robert West, director of tobacco studies at University College London, meanwhile, told BBC Radio 4's Today programme that smokers tended to stop "in clumps".

Start Quote

It's key that smokers don't give up trying to give up”

End Quote Jean King, Cancer Research UK

"We are social animals, we are herd animals and we are influenced by each other," he said.

He added: "So I think there's good reason to believe setting it up as a mass movement, if you like, would give you a bit of extra bang for your buck."

Jean King, director of tobacco control at Cancer Research UK, which is backing the campaign, said: "Smoking accounts for one in four cancer deaths and nearly a fifth of all cancer cases so it's vital that work continues to support smokers to quit.

"Breaking the addiction is difficult, so new and innovative campaigns such as this are hugely important."

She added: "It's key that smokers don't give up trying to give up."

 

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  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 503.

    Campaigns should not be knocked. They do have an impact: smoking has declined over many years. I gave up when I was 28 having tried to give up on innumerable occasions. I suggest reducing smoking by one cigarette per day per week so if you smoke 20 a day you could be down to 1 per day in about 5 months.
    Giving up is the proudest achievement of my life as it was so difficult.
    Alan

  • rate this
    +2

    Comment number 502.

    A step in the right direction. Hopefully this time next year they wil ban smoking completely.

    Smoking kills you slowly, kills those around you, makes you smell horrible and is simply stupid.

    Banning smoking is the way forward.

    But you miss the plus side .. its cheaper than cocaine and it keeps the anti smokers away from you !

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 501.

    A step in the right direction. Hopefully this time next year they wil ban smoking completely.

    Smoking kills you slowly, kills those around you, makes you smell horrible and is simply stupid.

    Banning smoking is the way forward.

  • Comment number 500.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 499.

    I just stopped smoking 8 months ago. I'm fed up with people asking me if I feel better, I never felt ill. Now I'm bad tempered and feel very much under par. I'm assuming I'll feel better as time goes by. I would love a cigarette but I won't ever have one again. I wish smokers could be left alone, it's their right to choose.

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 498.

    I will give up smoking and drinking only after they find a cure for alzheimer's, senility, arthritis and all the other nasties that await me in my old age !

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 497.

    As a non smoker, i had many opportunities at a younger age to start. I didnt, even though both my parents are. I just chose not to. That doesnt mean i am anti-smoking. If people are aware of the health issues involved, but continue, it is that persons choice as a citizen. As long as peoples freedoms are upheld, then we should just move forward educating people and not forcing them to stop.

  • rate this
    +2

    Comment number 496.

    Why do humans take in mind altering substances ?

    Could it be they don't like them being altered by institutionalised garbage spewing from our so called free democracy ?

    There"s definitely something in keeping with the odd non conformance now & again.

  • rate this
    -1

    Comment number 495.

    "What about a campaign for Drivers to give up there cars for a month.
    They are the the biggest cancer and other long term disease givers to other people."

    But cars serve a useful purpose. How do you suggest people who live a distance from work commute if there are no buses or trains if they give up THEIR cars (thought I'd help you out with the spelling)? Yours is a null argument.

  • rate this
    +2

    Comment number 494.

    As another Allen Carr advocate who quit painlessly with his book, I think that this campaign is a waste of time. It is essentially telling smokers to make what they think is a big sacrifice. Leaving people in want for a month will do nothing to convince them they are better off without smoking. Addiction skews peoples weighing up of risk vs reward, this is what needs adressing to help people quit.

  • rate this
    +15

    Comment number 493.

    For all those saying we should make smokers pay for their own healthcare to force them to stop. We only have to venture across the Atlantic to the USA to see how successful this scheme is...

    ...oh wait

  • rate this
    -1

    Comment number 492.

    As a member of the non smoking brigade, it’s clear that all these campaigns will affect us more than a smoker. If by pushing these campaigns, out-casting smokers, where will the lost Tax revenue come from? If a smoker is happy to destroy their health and pay a small fortune for the pleasure let them, why should the rest of us have to pay the consequences for taking their lifestyle choice away.

  • Comment number 491.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • rate this
    -1

    Comment number 490.

    "I'm afraid all these health campaigns being mounted by the Govt. are no more than an exercise in "something must be done, and we must be seen to be doing it.""

    So, given your other premise that smokers already know it's bad, what do YOU suggest be done? It's all very well criticising, but do you have a better suggestion?

  • rate this
    +2

    Comment number 489.

    Well said
    487
    I was a 20 a day smoker for 56 years, last year in August bought an e-cig and never had a tobacco cigarette since, feel great all smoking symptoms gone. just have to buy a big battery one, not the cheap look alikes.

  • rate this
    +2

    Comment number 488.

    If this works it could tip us into a recession !

    It can only be boosted by sales of ready meals, nicotine substitutes, alcohol, take outs & other tremendously healthy options.

    Don"t think "Cold Turkey" is on the menu ?

  • rate this
    +2

    Comment number 487.

    I am 48 and smoked 20 a day till the beginning of May when I switched to e-ciggies. I still get the nicotine but none of the harmful stuff. I have a range of e-cig devices, none of which look remotely like a real cigarette. I am one of the hopeless cases that would never give up and probably smoke myself to death. E-ciggies are the way for me.

  • Comment number 486.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • rate this
    -2

    Comment number 485.

    Here's an idea, stop wasting money on asinine issues. We can call it astember.

  • rate this
    +2

    Comment number 484.

    478. Under-Used

    And you have alternative numbers to quantify the effects of productivity impacts of smoking (sick pay, tax lost from lower productivity), cost of illness of the children of smokers, fires etc with evidence to back it up? You can't just disregard such information because it doesn't conform to your biases, you know? The economic cost of smoking isn't just the direct NHS cost.

 

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