Fat, pregnant or both?

 
pregnant woman with food Pregnant women need only increase their food intake by a relatively small amount rather than "eating for two"

"I'm not fat, I'm pregnant!" Actually, some women may be both but there are currently no UK guidelines to help midwives and women define how much is too much when it comes to weight gain during pregnancy.

In this week's Scrubbing Up, Bridget Benelam from the British Nutrition Foundation says there needs to be clear advice on weight control for pregnant women.

Nearly half of women of childbearing age are overweight or obese in the UK and this means there are increasing numbers of obese pregnant women. But spotting those mothers whose bumps are due to fat as well as baby is difficult, not least because there are no UK guidelines on how much weight women should gain during pregnancy.

Pregnancy weight gain varies and depends on many things - including the weight of the baby, the amount of amniotic fluid and the mother's increased blood volume - as well as body fat. Some additional fat is stored during pregnancy to provide a reserve for breast feeding when the baby is born.

But excessive weight gain during pregnancy carries health risks for the mother and child. It also makes the delivery of the baby more difficult, with caesarean sections and forceps deliveries more common. All this puts a strain on an already stretched maternity service.

Despite the common idea that women need to "eat for two" when pregnant, there is actually only a small number of extra calories needed in pregnancy.

No extra calories are needed during the first 28 weeks of pregnancy and only an extra 200kcal per day are required during the last 12 weeks, the equivalent of two small slices of bread.

In a survey of over 6,000 women carried out by the Royal College of Midwives and NetMums last year, 61% said their midwife did not have enough time to discuss their concerns about weight management and nutrition, meaning many women may embark on pregnancy without having discussed how to manage their weight at this important time.

What is a healthy pre-pregnancy weight?

  • Experts assess obesity using a scale called BMI or body mass index
  • This is calculated by dividing your weight in kilograms by your height in metres squared
  • A BMI between 18.5 and 25 is ideal
  • A BMI of 25-30 is overweight
  • A BMI of 30 or more is obese

And whilst there is a clear need for readily available advice, guidance is lacking.

Current recommendations in England from NICE (National Institute for health and Clinical Excellence ) do not address the issue of how much weight gain is healthy in pregnancy. Indeed, they flag up the need for UK-specific guidance.

These guidelines, issued in 2010, do say that women who are overweight or obese should be encouraged to lose weight before trying for a baby.

However, they say once a woman is pregnant, she should not be encouraged to diet to lose weight as this may harm the health of the growing baby and so women should follow a healthy diet and be physically active.

But what does this mean in practice?

In the US, guidelines go further.

The Institute of Medicine sets out what is a healthy weight gain - 25 to 35 pounds (11.5 to 16kg) during pregnancy for women at a normal weight for their height.

And it says overweight and obese women should gain less weight during pregnancy than lean women. For example, no more than 20 pounds (9kg) for the most obese.

Pregnancy is a window of opportunity where women are particularly interested in looking after their health and that of their growing baby.

Getting the right help and advice about weight control to pregnant women (and those planning a pregnancy) could help to reduce the risks to both mums and their babies, and also help mitigate the strain that obesity in pregnancy puts on the health service.

But midwives need support in delivering this advice on weight control, something they may never have been trained to provide. Arming them with clear guidance would be a good place to start.

 

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  • rate this
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    Comment number 140.

    Easy to judge but not so easy in practice. I was a Judger but last pregnancy working long hours, not knowing what was safe at the gym, being really tired all the time = a 4 stone gain. This time I'm still cycling at 6 months but working lunches and a toddler = no real spare time and the weight is bound to pile on.

  • rate this
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    Comment number 139.

    There is not enough emphasis on remaining fit and healthy in pregnancy here in the UK. I know of a number of women who thought it was an excuse to indulge themselves for 9 months, and have really struggled to get the weightgain under control afterwards - very sad.

  • rate this
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    Comment number 138.

    I was pregnant on the continent where they have a completely different attitude to weightgain in pregnancy. I did not put on more than 10kg (the recommended weight gain) with either, and I was back in my pre-pregnancy clothes within a week of birth. I am not a super woman & I did not diet. I ate properly & breastfed both children fully for 9 months each.

  • rate this
    -1

    Comment number 137.

    Just returned from Tesco - judging by the amount of crisps, coke bottles and generally processed food in people's trolleys i'm not in the least bit suprised that we have an obesity problem in the uk!!

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 136.

    @135 I think that highly unlikely.I didn't eat any more whilst pregnant, or any less afterwards.While pregnant my normally fast metabolism slows right down:Mother natures way of ensuring that I can sustain a child both before & after birth.One has to wonder at Mothers who artificially feed their babies after apparently not producing enough milk. Lack of calories from inappropriate dieting perhaps?

  • rate this
    -1

    Comment number 135.

    @130 Hatina - do you not think that increasing your own body weight by 80% and back again - three times - will have done you some long-term damage?! It seems to me that women just use pregnancy as an excuse to pig out for 9 months.

  • rate this
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    Comment number 134.

    I put on over 6st with both my children, going from 7 1/2st to 13-14 st. Both my children were 9lb, and I was back in my size 8 clothes within 6 weeks and no I didn't diet to get there. I was still eating lots as I was breast feeding. I think this goes to show not all of us follow the books and medical guidelines as our bodies are unique. ~Both my adult children are slim, fit and healthy.~

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 133.

    Having read the comments below I think a lot of people are missing the point of this article... It is saying pregnant women need more advice in this area.

  • rate this
    -1

    Comment number 132.

    Can I just say, that as a 36 year old male, I have lots of experience of cravings. I crave Mars Bars and biscuits daily! I just don't have the excuse of pregnancy to give into them, so I don't. Or if I do, I go for a run to make up for it. Come, on blimps - get a grip! Remember that your husbands/partners are not going to thank you if you come out the other side looking like Bella Emberg...

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 131.

    #121 - exactly what I was talking about in #117!!! Our bodies are always telling us to eat more of that lovely fatty/sugary food - it's in our genes - we didn't evolve in a fast food culture but in the wild in times of frequent hardship. We should never listen to our appetites, but apply reason and logic to control them in the world we now inhabit. Pregnancy is hard hard work, but not an excuse!

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 130.

    I really don't think mothers-to-be should be calorie counting. As others have said the weight quickly drops off after the birth, when you need the extra calories to feed the baby.
    I put on between and five and six stone with all three pregnancies, but was back to seven and a half stone within weeks of the birth.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 129.

    Going by the the other 'fat story' HYS the answer would seem to be 'sterilise anyone with a BMI over 30', that or shove them in a camp until they're suitably skinny.

    The BBC really needs to ease off on this subject. Most fat people know they're fat and how this renders them utterly worthless non-humans in this society. This constant barrage of hostility toward 'the obese' is helping no-one.

  • rate this
    -1

    Comment number 128.

    104.Queen_Becci_B" It really is smack a fatty day on the BBC today"

    I've written a formal complaint about it, and suggest you and everyone else who's sick of the Beeb's constant harping on about how fat people are responsible for all the world's ills do the same. Fat people also pay the TV license (and taxes) and shouldn't accept being demonised as 'the enemy within' by institutions WE fund.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 127.

    I am 5 days away from my due date. You don't have to gain 2 much weight when your pregnant. When I first found out I weighed sixteen stone and half a pound and thanks to a healthy eating plan I lost one stone a pound and half in the first 4 months of my pregnancy then I have gradually only put twelve pound of that weight back on. You cannot force someone to eat healthy it has to be there choice.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 126.

    To Bridget (#114) - Why take the risk?!?! A single happy example of someone who got away with it should not be used to encourage all mums to be to turn into remorseless eating machines.

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 125.

    I was a midwife many years ago when midwives had time to do all this. I distinctly remember one woman who was 5'2" and 11 stones, so mildly obese. With the help of her midwife, G.P. and the dietician (but not her mother) she was the same weight when she went into labour. Her baby boy was 10lbs 5ounces and she walked out of the hospital weighing nine and a half stones.

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 124.

    117.Alf
    Seems instead of a debate here that we've got the usual mix of tubbypologists and self-obsessed mums desperate to tell their own story.Just a bunch of fat moaners only too pleased to use the excuse to cast off all restraint and gobble up everything in their path.Anyone criticising such indulgence is attacked for irresponsibly "scaring" them

    GOT IT IN ONE ALF

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 123.

    'Happy Mums Happy Kids' - actually kids appreciate their mums looking great.So do the dads?I believe the attitude of mums who think men must just accept they are overweight, are thoroughly selfish.The men are caught.Do these women appreciate their sex life at all?Men need to compromise,but how much?And fatty foods eg:chocs,pies are tempting quick meals for tired ladies.We need healthier snacks.

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 122.

    In response to FabulousJaxx (#115): Fat Mums Fat Kids.

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 121.

    Congratulations on stressing out mums-to-be with this article. Pregnant women should eat what and when they want and listen to their body.

 

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