Entertainment & Arts

Teletubbies voices revealed for new series

Jane Horrocks
Image caption Jane Horrocks will provide the voice of the new 'tubby phone'

Jane Horrocks, Jim Broadbent and Fearne Cotton are to provide voices for the new series of Teletubbies.

Absolutely Fabulous star Horrocks will voice the "tubby phone" - a mobile-style gadget aimed at bringing the revamped show into the modern day.

Actor Broadbent and former BBC Radio 1 DJ Cotton will also be heard coming through voice trumpets which pop out of the ground.

The series is due to air on CBeebies later this year.

Eric And Ernie actor Daniel Rigby will narrate the new show, while Sunshine On Leith actress Antonia Thomas will lend her voice to the opening and closing lines.

Image caption The show's original narrator was playwright and former actor Tim Whitnall

Producers said the series would feature the same characters and style as the original show, which ran from 1997 to 2001, but with a "refreshed and contemporary look".

"I am very excited to be playing the tubby phone in the new series," Horrocks said.

"The series has a whole new feel to it. I think it's hilarious and it will appeal to adults as much as it does children."

The actress is no stranger to voicing children's television - she has previously worked on Little Princess and Fifi and the Flowertots.

Image caption Fearne Cotton and Jim Broadbent will be heard through voice trumpets

Oscar winner Broadbent, who provided voices on animated films Arthur Christmas and Postman Pat: The Movie, said: "Teletubbies is truly a British institution and it's very exciting to be involved in bringing this global hit back to our TV screens."

Cotton added: "Teletubbies holds a special place in my heart so I'm honoured to be part of this well-loved TV show.

"As a mum, I am sure the new series will enthral a whole new generation of children across Britain and I will certainly be watching with my kids."

The original Teletubbies series was watched by around one billion children in more than 120 countries in 45 languages.

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