Children's programming comes to an end on BBC One

 

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Children's television programmes will be broadcast on BBC One for the last time on Friday.

Shows including Blue Peter and Horrible Histories will now only go out on the CBBC digital channel.

The Cbeebies strand on BBC Two in the mornings will finish on 4 January, with pre-school programming then only available on the Cbeebies channel.

The changes are part of BBC-wide cost cutting but investment in children's programming will remain the same.

The final strand of CBBC on BBC One will go out on Friday afternoon, featuring a Blue Peter Christmas special and the CBeebies panto.

'Absolutely fundamental'

The decision to end children's programming on terrestrial channels was agreed by the BBC Trust in March, as the BBC looked ahead to the digital switchover.

Former children's presenter Andy Crane: ''It's a shame but it's the way of the world these days''

All analogue transmitters have now been switched off, which means all television broadcasts are digital, and viewers should be able to receive Freeview channels such as CBBC and Cbeebies.

And because of the way young audiences now consume television, there is unlikely to be a drop in viewing figures.

"Children's programmes are absolutely fundamental to the BBC and that is why we have protected investment in them in the light of cuts elsewhere," said the BBC Trust.

"Only a very small percentage of children still solely watch these programmes on BBC One and BBC Two alone, so moving them to digital channels is merely following current viewing patterns and reflects the fact that CBeebies and CBBC will be universally available on digital TV."

 

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  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 144.

    Nostalgia aside, this is a thoroughly logical development now that everyone has access to digital channels, but I hope that it does not extend to the early evening Childrens' News, which I would hope is still carried by BBC1.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 132.

    This is one of those sad happenings that reminds you that you are growing older and the little things that connected you to your past are becoming fewer and far between. It completely makes sense from the BBC's perspective, I just hope that it still allows for what I call "everyone" programming, such as Wallace and Gromit.

  • rate this
    +4

    Comment number 115.

    Truly sad... we still watch a little of the BBC2 childrens programmes in the morning, them ending at a certian time means no more kiddie telly!!! Its a cue to be able to get on with the rest of the day for some children. Now it is a constant until 7pm will they ever be able to move off the sofa?

    Also, what repeats will be aired now? all seems rather pointless tbh

  • rate this
    +18

    Comment number 74.

    This is very sad. As a child I would often keep watching after Ivor the Engine and start to show an interest in the news. Likewise I would love it when my Dad would join me watching some childrens programmes as he waited for grown-up programming. It was like introducing him to my friends. Presumably a child simply retunes now at the age of 16? What a sad transition.

  • rate this
    +3

    Comment number 65.

    Correct me if I've misunderstood but children will now have a dedicated channel to watch at the simple click of a remote.

    I was going to say that isn't exactly rocket science but then if some of us need to do anyone more complex with our TV sets our children generally have a better grasp of modern technology......

 

Comments 5 of 12

 

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