A history of British homes - Sarah Beeny

From the first Georgian townhouses to back-to-back Victorian terraces - and from 1960s towerblocks to sprawling modern estates - British homes have changed their shapes and sizes, and changed with the times, through the past 250 years.

In a new exhibition - A Place to call Home: Where we live and why - the Royal Institute of British Architects studies the way housing was adapted to meet the needs of a growing population entering the modern age.

Here, guest curator of the exhibition, property developer and television presenter Sarah Beeny, takes a journey through time.

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A Place to call Home: Where we live and why - can be seen at the Royal Institute of British Architects, London, until 28 April 2012.

All images subject to copyright. See captions for full image details. Additional material from PA, Getty Images and Rex Features.

Music courtesy KPM Music, and also features theme to Brookside. Slideshow production by Paul Kerley. Publication date 16 February 2012.

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Royal Institute of British Architects

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