David Hare wins Pinter literary prize

Sir David Hare Sir David is known for his gritty portrayals of contemporary Britain

Related Stories

Playwright Sir David Hare has been awarded this year's Pen/Pinter Prize, it has been announced.

The award, set up by the writers' charity Pen in memory of playwright Harold Pinter, is given to a British writer who casts an "unflinching, unswerving" gaze upon the world.

Pinter's widow, Lady Antonia Fraser, said Sir David was a "worthy winner".

He will be presented with his prize on 10 October at the British Library.

The award will be shared with an imprisoned "writer of courage" who has been persecuted for speaking out about their beliefs, to be announced at the event.

Lady Antonia said: "In the course of his long, distinguished career, David Hare has never failed to speak out fearlessly on the subject of politics in the broadest sense.

"This courage, combined with his rich creative talent, makes him a worthy winner of the Pen/Pinter Prize".

Known for his gritty portrayals of contemporary Britain, Sir David's notable works include Plenty, a portrait of disillusionment in post-war Britain, and The Absence of War, a drama about the Labour Party.

He was nominated for Oscars for The Hours, in 2003, and for Kate Winslet drama The Reader, in 2008.

He has also directed and written spy thriller Page Eight, starring Bill Nighy and Rachel Weisz, which will be screened on BBC Two on Sunday 28 August at 21:00 BST.

More on This Story

Related Stories

The BBC is not responsible for the content of external Internet sites

More Entertainment & Arts stories

RSS

Features

  • Spanner CrabEdible images

    Are these the best food photographs of the past year?


  • Beckford's TowerFolly or fact?

    The unlikely debt capital of Britain


  • European starlingBird-brained

    How 60 starlings multiplied into a nightmare flock of 200 million


  • Observatory in Chile with sun in the backgroundStar struck

    Why tourists are flocking to Chile's observatories


  • Two people using sign language Signing out

    The decline of regional dialects for the deaf


BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.