Sharp rise in 'Three Rs' primary results

Maths Maths scores were up one percentage point

There has been a sharp rise in the percentage of pupils in England's primary schools achieving the expected level in the "Three Rs", data shows.

Four out of five 11-year-olds (79%) achieved Level 4 in their Sats tests in reading, writing and arithmetic, up from 75% in 2013.

Results in the new grammar and spelling tests, first sat in 2013, rose three percentage points at Level 4 to 76%.

The government said thousands more pupils were secure in the basics.

'Prepare for life'

School reform minister Nick Gibb said the results showed that teachers and pupils had responded well to the higher standards his government's education reforms have demanded.

"Our education system is beginning to show the first fruits of our plan for education, helping to prepare young people for life in modern Britain. There is more to do but teachers and pupils deserve huge credit for such outstanding results."

He said: "Eighty thousand more children than five years ago will start secondary school this year secure in the basics - and able to move on to more complex subjects. It means in the long term these children stand a far better chance of winning a place at university, gaining an apprenticeship and securing good jobs.

"We have set unashamedly high expectations for all children, introduced a new test in the basics of punctuation, spelling and grammar, and removed calculators from maths tests."

In detail, the results show improvements in all subjects at Level 4.

• Reading - 89% - up five percentage points

• Spelling, punctuation and grammar 76% - up three percentage points

• Maths - 86% - up one percentage point

• Writing 85% - up two percentage points (Based on teacher assessments)

From this year, schools are deemed to be underperforming if fewer than 65% of pupils achieve Level 4 in all subjects in the last year of primary school.

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