Teachers' union 'no confidence' vote against Gove

Michael Gove The NUT is the latest teachers' union to pass a motion of no confidence in Michael Gove

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The National Union of Teachers' conference has unanimously passed a motion of no confidence in the Education Secretary, Michael Gove.

With chants of "Gove must go" teachers at the annual conference in Liverpool called for Mr Gove's resignation.

Christine Blower, the NUT's general secretary, said Mr Gove could soon face his "poll tax moment".

A Department for Education spokeswoman said: "For too long other countries have been outpacing us."

Successive speakers at the NUT conference have focused angry attacks on the education secretary.

In the no confidence debate on Tuesday, Nick O'Brien from Norwich told teachers: "It is Mr Gove and his government who have broken the hearts and futures of our brilliant young people by fixing exam results, scrapping the education maintenance allowance and being part of a vicious government whose policies have caused mass young unemployment.

"How dare he. Gove must go."

Oliver Fayers, who put forward the motion, asked "How long do parents and children have to tolerate their education system being run this badly?"

The union's general secretary Christine Blower said: "Quite simply the secretary of state has lost the confidence of most teachers."

Last week, the ATL teachers' union also passed a motion of no confidence in Mr Gove.

A Department for Education spokeswoman said: "Our reforms are giving teachers more freedom, increasing choice for parents so every child can go to a good local school, and ensuring we have an education system that matches the world's best. This ambition is surely something the NUT should be supporting.

"Good teaching is critical to the success of our education system and we are making sure that it is properly recognised. We have significantly reduced bureaucracy, given more autonomy to schools than ever before through our academy and free school programmes and are ensuring good teachers are better recognised through the pay system."

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