Prince's Trust: School grades hit by lack of routine

 
Bedtime story A set bedtime can help give a child structure

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Children who grow up without a daily routine of set bedtimes and mealtimes do worse at school, a report suggests.

Research for the Prince's Trust suggests those with poor exam grades are twice as likely to claim their days lacked structure as they grew up.

The study of 2,136 16- to 25-year-olds found more than a quarter did not have a set bedtime while growing up.

Youngsters with poorer grades were also twice as likely to say they did not have regular mealtimes.

Some 14% of young people said they had grown up without set mealtimes, compared with 30% of those with poor exam grades.

The research also suggests that 27% of youngsters did not grow up with a set bedtime. This rose to 39% for those who left school with fewer than five good GCSEs.

'Less confident'

The data comes from the charity's latest annual Youth Index, which looks at how young people feel about their lives across a range of areas from family life to physical health.

It also suggested those who felt they "lacked structure and direction" while growing up also appeared to be less content and confident than their peers.

One in three of those with lower qualifications (33%) said they "always" or "often" felt rejected, compared with about one in five young people (22%) overall.

Princes Trust chief executive Martina Milburn said: "The absence of structure and routine in a young life can have a devastating impact.

"Without the right support, directionless teenagers can become lost young adults - unconfident, underqualified and unemployed."

 

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  • rate this
    -1

    Comment number 205.

    kids need a good role model... parents, drag them to school... i got dragged to school kid if i didn't want to go and now im in university... im not blaming parent but also its to do with school!! these days they are filled with bullying and under disciplinary action. if the government were not such wimps with disciplining kids it would solve a whole host of problems.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 204.

    The Prince's Trust is doing awfully well with or without Charles Windsor as figurehead. Thirty-five years old and amid requests for donations for £50 million (to 'help over 50,000 young people this year') its website carries the banner; "Over a million young people are not in education, employment or training." It's a stealth tax guilt-trip isn't it - as governments busily ignore the problem?

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 203.

    Ah, yes the Prince's Trust. The PR machine for the current Prince of Wales. What a paragon of virtue you are not Charles.

  • rate this
    -1

    Comment number 202.

    What the baby boomers here simply don't understand is it take two or more adults working full time to afford a Barratt home rabbit hutch right now, not the the £3000 you paid for your bungalow by the seaside in 1971, cont

  • rate this
    -1

    Comment number 201.

    Association is not causality. Just because they say that they had no structure at home does not mean that that was the cause of the poor academic performance. There is an association only. Drawing conclusions from such poor quality data is dangerous

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 200.

    @43, thats the thing, isn't it.....I think if the parents care enough to team up with the school to mould a model pupil/citizen, with love and support at home, the kid is more likely to respond in a positive manner. I had all that but still dropped out at 16!!! It takes the right type of kid, who has to WANT to do well.

  • rate this
    +3

    Comment number 199.

    I find it hard to believe that anyone has found it possible to disagree with the fact that children with poor routines find it more difficult to learn than if they had good routines. ie A bright disorganised person may do better than a dull organised person, but doesn't do as well as they could.
    Learning, after all, needs an organised approach to gathering, analysing and reassembling information.

  • rate this
    -1

    Comment number 198.

    mmm, which households would be more likely not to have set patterns for their children? Perhaps the poorest families? The families that have the lowest out look for their children? A family that looks after their children properly? Yet another pointless report that skirts around the issue of inadequate parenting rearing disobedient, semi-educated children.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 197.

    LOL - it sometimes boggles the imagination to see so many people simply lap up an obviously fallacious experimental conclusion.
    Regular bedtimes and mealtimes - especially if imposed by parents - confer NO magical academic abilities on children.
    But kids who are smart and motivated to do well, will, by necessity, start to figure out how to manage their time in a sustainable way.
    Cause then effect.

  • rate this
    +2

    Comment number 196.

    Routine is very important to a child's development. It is how they learn at that age, unless they're a child prodigy and can learn new things the first time once. Even things they find fun takes time to learn through repetition, routine and discipline. The greatest martial arts masters will tell you that.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 195.

    When I was young it was; breakfast with mum and dad. Lunch at school with my friends, dinner with mum & dad. Did homework with dad helped mum with the washing up, then we played games after.

    Installing route isn’t difficult, just takes good parents to do so.

    what’s the issue?

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 194.

    Curiously, when I googled the Prince's Trust and looked at the endless list of 'recognised subscribers' - and googled them - it would appear that the Prince's Trust needs a serious shake up. Many that are listed are possibly income nil and outgoing nil as a tax-break?

    What does that suggest to you and your involvement Prince Charles? Personally, I would say that you barely pay lip service and PR

  • rate this
    +2

    Comment number 193.

    Surely the easiest way to set a regular bedtime is by storytelling ( obviously this applies to younger children!). This activity seems to have gone out of fashion lately, and schools, both teachers and governing bodies, could encourage parents, improve reading and instil a love of books at the same time. Time for a campaign, Mr Cameron!

  • rate this
    +2

    Comment number 192.

    What surprises me, is that this information should even be considered as a surprise to anyone. Of course children who have a well structured routine will do better in school. The presence of a routine denotes a stable family environment, which in turn lends itself to times set aside for homework, exam revision and education in general. A link between the two is hardly a groundbreaking discovery.

  • rate this
    +2

    Comment number 191.

    171.MikeyMoo
    Contrary to some fashionable belief human biology and neurophysiology has not changed. Children and adult basic needs are pretty much what they were in 1955, 1935, 1865, 1725 etc. Sleep requirements/biochemical needs/diurnal cycles/psychological processes are not influenced by on demand TV or the Internet. What you want is not always good for you overall.

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 190.

    The young lady to whom I refer is not nec. a bad parent but left school at 16 w no quals.("didn't really like schoool"),served a few coffees in a local cafe, got pregnant, produced & for the last 2+ yrs has had £950.00 rent, Council Tx, living expenses&child allowance paid(also free prescriptions & dental treatmnt?)=abt £1600 take-home p.m Grandmther pays extras.She is v. happy.What an example.

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 189.

    I expect it's already been said but once again, this is simply a statment of the b******g obvious. Does the Prince's Trust enjoys such an excess of resource that it can afford to fund "research" such as this? There must be more difficult problems to investigate. If they clear answers to such obvious issues they can just ask me. And like most people, I don't know a lot!

  • rate this
    +7

    Comment number 188.

    Imagine: a child playing video games from after school till midnight, interrupted by several calls to come for dinner. Imagine dinner as quick, quiet, & mostly gobbled in front of the telly. Imagine, no one telling this midnight owl to get to bed. Imagine this child doing poorly at school, and then tell me that you imagine this child will grow up organized, adaptive, & responsible.

  • rate this
    +2

    Comment number 187.

    Set mealtimes and bedtimes alone is probably not the reason for better grades but rather an indication of better parenting. I don't believe for a moment that conformity to a strict regimes will greatly affect a growing child's future for success or employment. Responsible parenting, parental guidance, and the societal education found in cohesive families plays a much greater role.

  • rate this
    +2

    Comment number 186.

    Rigid routines could be as damaging as no routine.
    I'm somewhat perplexed when people say common sense should prevail; whose "common sense"?
    Surely children need thought out boundaries for their behaviour, structure, a fair amount of predictability in their daily lives but room to explore for themselves and to test the boundaries without feeling they have to smash them.

 

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