Mapping child poverty in England, 2010

Roughly half a million fewer children were in poverty in the UK in 2008-09 than was the case in 1998-99, according to government figures.

The most recent figures calculate that 2.8 million children were living in poverty in the UK in 2008-09.

The headline measure for child poverty is the number of children living in households receiving 60% less than the median, or middle, household income before housing costs.

In England, the highest child poverty rates can be found in urban areas. Eight of the top 10 worst affected council areas are found in London, and there are no rural councils in the top 20 list, in the table below.

The coalition government has pledged to end child poverty by 2020.

Child poverty map
Map methodology

To produce a more up to date snapshot of child poverty than is available from official figures, the campaign group End Child Poverty classified children as being in poverty either if they live in households which are receiving benefits for being out of work, or if they are receiving in-work tax credits but their income is less than 60% of the median.

It is this methodology that has been used to produce the Child Poverty Map of the UK.

Figures for Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland will be available later in 2011.

Child poverty hotspots in England, 2010

Rank Council Children in poverty (%)

Source: End Child Poverty

1

Tower Hamlets

57

2

Islington

46

3

Hackney

44

4

Newham

43

5

Manchester

42

6

Westminster

41

7

Camden

41

8

Haringey

40

9

Barking & Dagenham

39

10

Nottingham

37

11

Enfield

37

12

Birmingham

36

13

Hammersmith & Fulham

36

14

Lambeth

36

15

Liverpool

35

16

Brent

35

17

Waltham Forest

35

18

Southwark

34

19

Middlesbrough

34

20

Leicester

34

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