Did Dubya help to save the world?

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Image caption Cheers COP21! Did President Bush unwittingly play a role in developing the Paris Agreement?

Who should the world really thank for delivering a comprehensive, ambitious agreement that promises to deal with the issue of climate change over the course of this century?

Laurent Fabius? Christiana Figueres? Francois Hollande?

Certainly all three played hugely significant roles. There are many others, Al Gore, Mary Robinson, Laurence Tubiana among them.

But perhaps we should also consider another, more accidental climate change "progressive" - George W Bush?

Under the terms of the Paris deal, countries will come up with their own national proposals on cutting carbon and these will be reviewed every five years in an effort to increase ambition. These will be voluntary. The key element is the fact that this is a bottom up approach to tackling the problem.

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Has history been made at COP21?

I'm not a fan of hyperbole, but it would be churlish to say the adoption of the Paris Agreement was anything other than a globally, historic moment.

This carefully worded document that balances the right of countries to develop with the need to protect the planet is a truly world changing instrument.

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COP21: Five unanswered questions at climate conference

Protesters in Star Wars dress in Paris Image copyright EPA
Image caption Protesters have been raising climate change awareness at the COP21 climate conference

The latest draft version of a potential world changing agreement represents a substantial improvement on previous versions.

It's much shorter, with the key text of the actual agreement running to just 14 pages - the number of square brackets, indicating areas of disagreement, has reduced significantly to around 300 from more than 900.

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COP21: Will it be absolutely Fabius in Paris?

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Image caption French foreign minister Laurent Fabius is insisting the climate conference will finish on time

As ministers arrive and this conference enters its final week, two big questions remain.

Can the politicians seal a deal that will have long-term implications for the health of the planet - and can the French change their hard-earned reputation for grumpiness on an epic scale?

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Now that the leaders have left COP21, what happens next?

Laurent Fabius, COP21 president, 1 December 2015 Image copyright Getty Images
Image caption The hand of history? COP21 president Laurent Fabius with French leader Francois Hollande

Many negotiators will have breathed a big sigh of relief - the bosses have come and gone.

Everyone said the right things. The prospects of a deal, haven't been harmed, even if they weren't hugely advanced.

Read full article Now that the leaders have left COP21, what happens next?

COP21: Fine words but divisions run deep

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Image caption Handshakes and warm words on the opening day: Now the hard work begins

"We are on the front line; we will fall. It must not happen to anybody else," says the President of Kiribati, Anote Tong.

For our interview, he has come out into the main conference centre, away from the leader's compound, where heads of state and prime ministers have been speaking to delegates here all through the day.

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Will coal be on the dole after COP21?

Coal-fired plant generating power Image copyright PA
Image caption Many countries still rely on coal-fired power

For coal, COP21 is meant to be the start of the long goodbye.

This is the conference that's supposed to consign the black stuff to the ash heap of history.

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Copenhagen ghosts haunt climate talks

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Image caption UN climate chief Christiana Figueres and French foreign minister Laurent Fabius are hoping that talks will stay on track to secure a deal in Paris

"I already seen that movie, it doesn't end well, it doesn't, it gets really nasty." So said Venezuelan negotiator Claudia Salerno in a tense session here at the Bonn climate talks on Thursday evening.

"I hope this is not going to be just a really, really nasty second Copenhagen," she said to sustained applause.

Read full article Copenhagen ghosts haunt climate talks

Warming tempts China in from the cold

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Image caption All smiles at the White House as China and the US find common ground on climate change

It's been a bit of a dream week for the "warmist" brigade!

Clambering out of his tiny Fiat 500 car, the Pope came to Washington to tell the world that dealing with climate change can no longer be left to future generations.

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Real deal or meal deal? Will new climate treaty be a 'nothing burger'?

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Image caption France is investing significant political capital in securing a new global deal on climate change

The fate of the world won't be decided over the next three weeks - but the fate of a proposed global climate treaty just might be.

By the first week in October the world should have a good idea what the shape and scale of that ambitious project will be.

Read full article Real deal or meal deal? Will new climate treaty be a 'nothing burger'?