Woman receives bionic hand with sense of touch

  • 3 January 2018
  • From the section Health
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Media captionAlmerina Mascarello who lost her hand in an accident nearly 25 years ago said she now 'feels complete'

Scientists in Rome have unveiled the first bionic hand with a sense of touch that can be worn outside a laboratory.

The recipient, Almerina Mascarello, who lost her left hand in an accident nearly a quarter of a century ago, said "it's almost like it's back again".

In 2014 the same international team produced the world's first feeling bionic hand.

But the sensory and computer equipment it was linked to was too large to leave the laboratory.

Now the technology is small enough to fit in a rucksack, making it portable.

Read full article Woman receives bionic hand with sense of touch

How long could we live?

  • 20 December 2017
  • From the section Health
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Media captionPeople over the age of 80 give their views on how to age the right way

How long do you want to live - to 85, 90, 100 or beyond? More important than how long we live is the state of our health in old age.

The oldest verified person to date was Jeanne Calment of France, who died in 1997 aged 122.

Read full article How long could we live?

Could drugs delay the diseases of ageing?

  • 19 December 2017
  • From the section Health
Hilda Jaffe
Image caption Hilda Jaffe is still working at 95

Imagine having to ask a 95-year-old to slow down - well, I did. Hilda Jaffe was walking so fast there was a risk that the small group following her would be left behind.

We had just met in the lobby of the New York Public Library on Fifth Avenue and 42nd Street, where Hilda is a volunteer tour guide, and she was escorting us to the vast, elaborately decorated Rose Main Reading Room.

Read full article Could drugs delay the diseases of ageing?

What are the secrets of the superagers?

  • 18 December 2017
  • From the section Health
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Media captionWatch the 84-year-old record-breaking athlete in action

What will you be like in your 80s? Living independently, robust in body and mind, with a wide social circle?

Manage that and you will be a superager. It is a worthy aspiration, but the reality is rather different for most of us.

Read full article What are the secrets of the superagers?

Baby born with heart outside body 'doing well'

  • 13 December 2017
  • From the section Health
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Media captionAgainst the odds: The story of baby Vanellope

A baby born with her heart outside her body has survived after surgery at Glenfield Hospital in Leicester.

Vanellope Hope Wilkins, who has no breastbone, was delivered three weeks ago by Caesarean section.

Read full article Baby born with heart outside body 'doing well'

The tragic case of Charlie Gard

  • 28 July 2017
  • From the section Health
Charlie Gard with his parents Image copyright Featureworld
Image caption Many question why Charlie's parents were not allowed to explore every option

The protracted and bitter dispute over Charlie Gard began with the breakdown in the relationship of trust between doctors and parents.

When his medical team, with second opinions from several leading centres, decided that his brain damage was irreversible, they believed there was nothing that could help him.

Read full article The tragic case of Charlie Gard

Terminally ill man Noel Conway in right-to-die fight

  • 17 July 2017
  • From the section Health
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Media captionNoel Conway: 'I want to be able to say goodbye at the right time'

The High Court has begun hearing the legal challenge of a terminally ill UK man who wants the right to die.

Noel Conway, who is 67 and has motor neurone disease, wants a doctor to be allowed to prescribe a lethal dose when his health deteriorates further.

Read full article Terminally ill man Noel Conway in right-to-die fight

What the brain's wiring looks like

  • 3 July 2017
  • From the section Health
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Media captionThe wiring of the human brain

The world's most detailed scan of the brain's internal wiring has been produced by scientists at Cardiff University.

The MRI machine reveals the fibres which carry all the brain's thought processes.

Read full article What the brain's wiring looks like

How lack of sleep affects the brain

  • 26 June 2017
  • From the section Health
Woman turning off alarm clock Image copyright Elenathewise

Scientists in Canada have launched what is set to become the world's largest study of the effects of lack of sleep on the brain.

A team, at Western University, Ontario, want people from all over the world to sign up online to do cognitive tests.

Read full article How lack of sleep affects the brain

Smoke alarms 'fail to wake children'

  • 23 February 2017
  • From the section Health
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Media captionIn a trial, children responded better to an alarm with a woman's voice

Forensic scientists and fire investigators have warned that smoke alarms may not wake children.

Research by Dundee University and Derbyshire Fire and Rescue found that of 34 children tested, 27 repeatedly slept through smoke detector alarms.

Read full article Smoke alarms 'fail to wake children'