Secret trial: One off - or the first of many?

  • 10 February 2016
  • From the section UK
Court sketch of Erol Incedal Image copyright Julia Quenzler
Image caption Erol Incedal's retrial took place at the Old Bailey in March last year

BREAKING: Reporter can't tell you what's happened.

Possibly the worst headline I've ever written. But before I'm accused of completely failing to perform basic contractual duties, allow me to explain why those seven words are rather important.

Since 2013, the BBC and almost every other leading news organisation in the UK has been locked in a bizarre battle to tell you the truth about Erol Incedal.

"Who he?" I hear you ask. He's a student from London who was accused of preparing some kind of major terrorism plan. And then after two trials he was found not guilty of that allegation. But I can't tell you why.

The prosecution of Erol Incedal has been, without a shadow of a doubt, the strangest criminal trial that those of us who report on the law have ever seen.

Read full article Secret trial: One off - or the first of many?

Tareena Shakil: Why British woman is guilty of joining Islamic State group

  • 29 January 2016
  • From the section UK
Tareena Shakil with her son in Syria
Image caption Tareena Shakil with her son in Syria

Tareena Shakil has become the first woman in the UK to be convicted of "membership" of the self-styled Islamic State organisation - but she never had a membership card, says she deeply regrets going to Syria, and - in a courtroom twist - told the jury she'd even helped MI5 on her return.

So why did she face this very serious charge and end up with a criminal conviction that could see her in prison for 10 years?

Read full article Tareena Shakil: Why British woman is guilty of joining Islamic State group

Syrian teenagers in Calais win UK asylum ruling

  • 20 January 2016
  • From the section UK
Jungle migrants camp, Calais Image copyright AFP
Image caption The four have been living in the Jungle camp in Calais

British judges have ruled that three Syrian teenagers and an adult in the Calais migrant camp can come to the UK immediately as they have siblings here.

An immigration tribunal told the Home Office to process their asylum claims because France had not already done so.

Read full article Syrian teenagers in Calais win UK asylum ruling

Woman wins undercover officer case against Met Police

  • 19 January 2016
  • From the section UK
Kate Wilson
Image caption Kate Wilson had a two-year relationship with an undercover police officer

A woman tricked into a relationship with an undercover police officer has become the first to formally win her case against Scotland Yard.

Kate Wilson, an environmental campaigner, had a two-year relationship with Mark Kennedy.

Read full article Woman wins undercover officer case against Met Police

Who is Siddhartha Dhar?

  • 4 January 2016
  • From the section UK
Abu Rumaysah
Image caption Siddhartha Dhar, also known as Abu Rumaysah, left London two days after he was released on bail in September 2014

Siddhartha Dhar, also known as Abu Rumaysah, is thought to be the new man behind the mask fronting threats to the UK from inside Syria.

Unlike the man he appears to have replaced - Briton Mohammed Emwazi, dubbed "Jihadi John" - Mr Rumaysah was a well-known and prolific figure among radical Islamists in London.

Read full article Who is Siddhartha Dhar?

The medieval law taking on Syria travellers

  • 31 December 2015
  • From the section UK
Kadiza Sultana, Amira Abase and Shamima Begum Image copyright Met Police
Image caption (From left) Kadiza Sultana, Amira Abase and Shamima Begum went missing in February from east London

If a family or teenagers want to go to Syria, should they be allowed to go? What about younger children? Over the last year, there have been a dozen cases where police and social services have sought court orders where there is evidence that children are either being taken towards the war zone - or trying to get there themselves.

Some 22 of these children has been made Wards of Court - a medieval law deployed to solve a very modern problem.

Read full article The medieval law taking on Syria travellers

Jail 'legal highs' using up local ambulances says watchdog

  • 18 December 2015
  • From the section UK
A catapult used to fire drugs into prison Image copyright HMIP
Image caption Purpose-built catapult: Used to fire drug packages into a prison

So many prisoners are falling ill from "legal highs" that it is damaging local ambulance services, a watchdog has warned.

Nick Hardwick, chief inspector of prisons, said abuse of psychoactive substances had turned them into the top jail security problem.

Read full article Jail 'legal highs' using up local ambulances says watchdog

UK will not ban Muslim Brotherhood, says David Cameron

  • 17 December 2015
  • From the section UK
Supporters of Mohammed Morsi protesting at Cairo University Image copyright AP
Image caption Mr Cameron says the movement is "deliberately opaque, and habitually secretive"

Membership or association with the Muslim Brotherhood is a "possible indicator of extremism" but it will not be banned, the prime minister has said.

A long-delayed review of the international Islamist network found parts of it had an "ambiguous relationship with violent extremism".

Read full article UK will not ban Muslim Brotherhood, says David Cameron

Allan Chappelow murder: Wang Yam's secret trial appeal fails

  • 16 December 2015
  • From the section UK
Wang Yam Image copyright JULIA QUENZLER
Image caption Yam's lawyers claimed more people would have come forward in his defence had the trial received more publicity

A man jailed for life for murder after a semi-secret trial has lost an attempt to disclose what happened to the European Court of Human Rights.

Wang Yam denied murdering reclusive author Allan Chappelow in north London - but his defence is unknown.

Read full article Allan Chappelow murder: Wang Yam's secret trial appeal fails

Police 'not properly prepared' to tackle honour-based crime

  • 8 December 2015
  • From the section UK
Shafilea Ahmed
Image caption Shafilea Ahmed was murdered by her parents in 2003 in a so-called "honour" killing

Police in England and Wales are not adequately prepared to combat so-called honour-based crimes, inspectors say.

In the first review of police responses, Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Constabulary said three forces out of 43 were completely unprepared and only three were fully prepared.

Read full article Police 'not properly prepared' to tackle honour-based crime