Nice attacks: Can a lorry attack ever be stopped?

  • 15 July 2016
  • From the section UK
A truck smashing into a truck barrier ramp
Image caption Testing a barrier: Just one of the options to stop a lorry attack

Can an attack like Nice ever be stopped?

If we want to live in a free and open society, then no security infrastructure could ever remove all the risks.

But there are really effective methods to stop lorry attacks and to protect public spaces. I'm among a small group of journalists fortunate enough to have seen one of the key methods tested, quite literally, to destruction.

If the method I saw in 2009 had been in place at Nice, it could and probably would, have stopped a lorry. More on that in a moment.

The US, Israel and the UK are among the nations that have led the thinking on protecting public spaces with the development of measures ranging from in-your-face massive barriers to incredibly subtle changes in the street scene that you and I would barely notice.

Read full article Nice attacks: Can a lorry attack ever be stopped?

Undercover police 'rulebook' published for first time

  • 29 June 2016
  • From the section UK
Mark Kennedy
Image caption Undercover officer Mark Kennedy infiltrated campaign groups - had a string of relationships

A rulebook covering the conduct of undercover police officers in England and Wales and how they are supervised has been published for the first time.

The draft guidance bans sexual relationships and says officers must submit to regular psychological tests.

Read full article Undercover police 'rulebook' published for first time

Undercover police: Legal challenge over inquiry

  • 10 June 2016
  • From the section UK
Mark Kennedy Image copyright Image courtesy of The Guardian
Image caption Mark Kennedy is one of the former officers

Campaigners who say they were victims of abuses by undercover police are threatening legal action to force a public inquiry to be extended to Northern Ireland.

In a legal warning letter to the home secretary, they say one of the officers at the centre of the affair operated beyond England and Wales.

Read full article Undercover police: Legal challenge over inquiry

Are Christian converts seeking asylum getting a raw deal?

  • 5 June 2016
  • From the section UK
A Farsi bible
Image caption Farsi Bible: Many converts from Iran attend secret "house churches"

Can you reel off the Ten Commandments?

If someone is asking the UK for protection as a refugee because they've converted to Christianity, should they know the answer?

Read full article Are Christian converts seeking asylum getting a raw deal?

Paraplegic man convicted of Syria-related terror charge

  • 11 May 2016
  • From the section UK
Abdallah
Image caption Abdal Raouf Abdallah has been in a wheelchair since he was injured in Libya at the age of 18

A British-Libyan man, left paralysed since he took part in the 2011 Libyan uprising, has been convicted of trying to help an RAF veteran travel to Syria to fight with militants there.

Abdal Raouf Abdallah, 23, from Manchester, had denied two counts of preparing acts of terrorism.

Read full article Paraplegic man convicted of Syria-related terror charge

Police and Crime Commissioners: Unloved but re-elected

A voter voting at the 2016 elections Image copyright PA

We now have 40 newly-elected police and crime commissioners across England and Wales - but what does it mean and does anybody care?

Back in 2012, the former coalition government's controversial plan to put elected police and crime commissioners in charge of the nation's constabularies was sold with one simple idea: people power.

Read full article Police and Crime Commissioners: Unloved but re-elected

Undercover police denied automatic anonymity at inquiry

  • 3 May 2016
  • From the section UK
Media captionFormer girlfriend: ‘We talked about spending the rest of our lives together’

Undercover police officers facing claims of wrongdoing will not automatically get anonymity at a forthcoming major public inquiry.

Sir Christopher Pitchford, the inquiry's chairman, said he recognised the public interest in proceedings being "as open as possible".

Read full article Undercover police denied automatic anonymity at inquiry

Hillsborough and the long journey to change the police

  • 29 April 2016
  • From the section UK
A Hillsborough family campaigner holding up a justice scarf Image copyright Reuters
Image caption Hillsborough families after this week's inquest verdict

There is a very important legal maxim: justice delayed is justice denied. Never was that truer than in the battle for answers over Hillsborough.

A 27-year wait to hear a jury say that the police were wrong, that the fans were innocent and 96 blameless people had been unlawfully killed.

Read full article Hillsborough and the long journey to change the police

Eurozone crisis 'pushing migrants to UK'

  • 13 April 2016
  • From the section UK
The British and EU flags Image copyright Reuters

The eurozone jobs crisis is encouraging more southern European migrants to head to the UK to join those from the east, the Migration Observatory has said.

Over the past five years the number of EU nationals living in the UK has gone up by almost 700,000 to 3.3 million.

Read full article Eurozone crisis 'pushing migrants to UK'

Afghan boy smuggled in lorry texted: 'No oxygen'

  • 8 April 2016
  • From the section UK
Media captionAhmed had been in a refugee camp in Calais

A seven-year-old Afghan boy who was in a sealed lorry was rescued by UK police after texting he was suffocating.

The boy, using a phone given by a charity in Calais, said he was running out of "oksijan" - meaning oxygen.

Read full article Afghan boy smuggled in lorry texted: 'No oxygen'