Undercover policing inquiry: Why it matters

  • 28 July 2015
  • From the section UK

The allegations of wrongdoing by undercover police officers that have emerged since 2011 have been extraordinary.

That steady stream of stories has led to the launch of a major public inquiry into their activities.

The breadth and nature of what is being alleged is almost too big to grasp, but it fundamentally comes down to a simple question of whether elements of the police were out of control.

So, here are seven key themes and allegations that lie in the road ahead - and some of the real practical and legal problems the inquiry faces.

1. The undercover relationships

Some police officers had relationships with women whom they met within the protest movements they had been deployed to infiltrate. Last year, the Metropolitan Police paid one woman who had a child with an officer £425,000 in compensation.

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Cyber-jihadist Babar Ahmad released

  • 19 July 2015
  • From the section UK
Babar Ahmad in prison
Image caption Babar Ahmad: Record legal battle against extradition

A British man jailed in the US over a website considered to be a key moment in the birth of the internet jihad has returned home.

Babar Ahmad left prison last month and is now back in London with family.

Read full article Cyber-jihadist Babar Ahmad released

Analysis: What's happening with knife crime?

  • 16 July 2015
  • From the section UK

What's going on with knife crime? Wasn't this an offence of the past - one that haunted a succession of home secretaries and chief constables but was now contained and controlled?

Knife crime never went away - it just fell quite a lot and, correspondingly, out of the headlines.

Read full article Analysis: What's happening with knife crime?

43 British women and girls in Syria, say police

  • 14 July 2015
  • From the section UK
Yusra Hussien Image copyright Avon and Somerset Police
Image caption Yusra Hussien, from Bristol, was among the first to leave the UK

UK counter-terrorism chiefs say 43 UK women and girls are believed to have travelled to Syria in the past year.

The Metropolitan Police figures are the first official count of British women thought to be in the warzone.

Read full article 43 British women and girls in Syria, say police

Can a school prevent extremism?

  • 13 July 2015
  • From the section UK
Five Live's Sarah Brett interviews students

For a school that is in "special measures", it doesn't feel like Carlton Bolling College is failing.

Exam results are good, improving and, if headteacher Adrian Kneeshaw and his team have got it right, they will be ahead of comparable schools within a year.

Read full article Can a school prevent extremism?

Azelle Rodney: Police shooter evidence explained

  • 3 July 2015
  • From the section UK

Why was a former police firearms officer found not guilty of the murder of a suspect he shot six times in 2005?

Anthony Long, who spent almost all of his career as an armed officer, shot dead Azelle Rodney after he and other officers surrounded the vehicle carrying the suspect and two accomplices.

Read full article Azelle Rodney: Police shooter evidence explained

7/7 attacks: Ten years on, how safe is the UK?

  • 30 June 2015
  • From the section UK
London bus bomb aftermath 7/7 Image copyright PA
Image caption Four bombs on three Tubes and a bus killed 52 and injured many more in 2005

Almost exactly 10 years ago, Londoners saw the bleeding and the injured emerge from the Underground - survivors of the 7 July bomb attacks.

The four bombs on three Tubes and a bus killed 52 and left many more with life-changing injuries.

Read full article 7/7 attacks: Ten years on, how safe is the UK?

Tunisia attack: What can UK police do?

  • 29 June 2015
  • From the section UK
Police on beach Image copyright AP
Image caption The Metropolitan Police has launched a massive operation

The investigation into the Tunisia beach attack has become one of the largest counter-terrorism operations the UK has seen in a decade.

Just a week away from the tenth anniversary of the 7 July London suicide attacks, the Metropolitan Police has launched an enormous operation to establish what happened, support families and help the Tunisians pursue every possible lead.

Read full article Tunisia attack: What can UK police do?

IS online: Can it be stopped?

  • 22 June 2015
  • From the section Europe

A Europe-wide police team is being formed to track and block social media accounts linked to Islamic State (IS).

They aim to get new accounts closed down within two hours of them being set up. Rob Wainwright, Europol's director, told the BBC that the new team, which starts its work on 1 July, "would be an effective way of combating the problem".


What's the scale of the self-styled Islamic State's presence online?

Image caption Briton Imran Khawaja, now jailed, took part in online propaganda strategy for extremists

Read full article IS online: Can it be stopped?

IS recruits: Victims or criminals?

  • 16 June 2015
  • From the section UK
Thomas Evans/Abdul Hakim Image copyright INS News Agency
Image caption Thomas Evans changed his name to Abdul Hakim - and was killed fighting with al-Shabab

Just over 18 months ago, the UK's Crown Prosecution Service nailed its colours to the mast over Syria, making clear that fighting in Syria would almost certainly lead to the criminal dock back home.

The language and responses of police, politicians and prosecutors hardened. Arrests under terrorism legislation went up.

Read full article IS recruits: Victims or criminals?