The imam killed because he wasn't 'Muslim enough'

  • 16 September 2016
  • From the section UK
An amulet given out in spiritual healing sessions by the imam who was later murdered
Image caption Amulet: Given out in spiritual healing sessions by the imam who was later murdered

On Friday a jury at Manchester Crown Court found Mohammed Syeedy guilty of murdering a 71-year-old imam - because he wasn't Muslim enough.

This is not just a crime that shocked the Muslim community in Rochdale where Jalal Uddin was bludgeoned to death.

It's also the second in less than a year in which one Muslim has killed another for not being Muslim enough - a form of sectarianism that we haven't really noticed in the UK.

Syeedy drove the getaway car for his alleged accomplice, Mohammed Kadir, who the trial heard had wielded the hammer in a children's park. Mr Kadir fled the UK to Turkey - and is now probably in Syria.

Why Syeedy didn't follow is a mystery - he'd recently renewed his passport and both were shown in court to be supporters of the self-styled Islamic State group.

Read full article The imam killed because he wasn't 'Muslim enough'

Undercover police: 'Officers won't face charges over evidence'

  • 8 September 2016
  • From the section UK
Mark Kennedy
Image caption Undercover officer Mark Kennedy infiltrated campaign groups

The attorney general has given a pledge that no one will face prosecution based on evidence given at the inquiry into undercover policing.

The assurance means former officers will not be prosecuted for on anything they say during the inquiry.

Read full article Undercover police: 'Officers won't face charges over evidence'

Anjem Choudary's American follower

  • 6 September 2016
  • From the section Magazine
Jesse Morton. Picture copyright - no reuse without permission Image copyright Al Drago/New York Times/Redux/eyevine
Image caption Jesse Morton today

Anjem Choudary has been jailed for five-and-a-half years in the UK for inviting others to support the Islamic State militant group, but his influence stretched all the way to the US.

If Jesse Morton had not, as he puts it, "opened his mind", he would be among the most dangerous men within walking distance of the White House.

Read full article Anjem Choudary's American follower

Social media giants 'failing' on extremism - MPs

  • 25 August 2016
  • From the section UK
Anjem Choudary Image copyright PA
Image caption Recently convicted cleric Anjem Choudary operated online for years

Social media companies are "consciously failing" to combat groups using their services to promote extremism, say MPs.

The Home Affairs Select Committee said firms including Facebook, Twitter and Google, which owns YouTube, must show "a greater sense of responsibility".

Read full article Social media giants 'failing' on extremism - MPs

How Anjem Choudary's mouth was finally shut

  • 16 August 2016
  • From the section Magazine
Anjem Choudary, 2015, outside Regent's Park Mosque Image copyright AFP

For 20 years Anjem Choudary stood on street corners, in shopping precincts, outside mosques, embassies and police stations and used his megaphone to drive a wedge between Muslims and the rest of Britain. Now he has been convicted of inviting others to support the Islamic State militant group.

The scenes would change - but not the words.

Read full article How Anjem Choudary's mouth was finally shut

Nice attacks: Can a lorry attack ever be stopped?

  • 15 July 2016
  • From the section UK
A truck smashing into a truck barrier ramp
Image caption Testing a barrier: Just one of the options to stop a lorry attack

Can an attack like Nice ever be stopped?

If we want to live in a free and open society, then no security infrastructure could ever remove all the risks.

Read full article Nice attacks: Can a lorry attack ever be stopped?

Undercover police 'rulebook' published for first time

  • 29 June 2016
  • From the section UK
Mark Kennedy
Image caption Undercover officer Mark Kennedy infiltrated campaign groups - had a string of relationships

A rulebook covering the conduct of undercover police officers in England and Wales and how they are supervised has been published for the first time.

The draft guidance bans sexual relationships and says officers must submit to regular psychological tests.

Read full article Undercover police 'rulebook' published for first time

Undercover police: Legal challenge over inquiry

  • 10 June 2016
  • From the section UK
Mark Kennedy Image copyright Image courtesy of The Guardian
Image caption Mark Kennedy is one of the former officers

Campaigners who say they were victims of abuses by undercover police are threatening legal action to force a public inquiry to be extended to Northern Ireland.

In a legal warning letter to the home secretary, they say one of the officers at the centre of the affair operated beyond England and Wales.

Read full article Undercover police: Legal challenge over inquiry

Are Christian converts seeking asylum getting a raw deal?

  • 5 June 2016
  • From the section UK
A Farsi bible
Image caption Farsi Bible: Many converts from Iran attend secret "house churches"

Can you reel off the Ten Commandments?

If someone is asking the UK for protection as a refugee because they've converted to Christianity, should they know the answer?

Read full article Are Christian converts seeking asylum getting a raw deal?

Paraplegic man convicted of Syria-related terror charge

  • 11 May 2016
  • From the section UK
Abdallah
Image caption Abdal Raouf Abdallah has been in a wheelchair since he was injured in Libya at the age of 18

A British-Libyan man, left paralysed since he took part in the 2011 Libyan uprising, has been convicted of trying to help an RAF veteran travel to Syria to fight with militants there.

Abdal Raouf Abdallah, 23, from Manchester, had denied two counts of preparing acts of terrorism.

Read full article Paraplegic man convicted of Syria-related terror charge