Undercover policing inquiry chief has motor neurone disease

  • 20 February 2017
  • From the section UK
Sir Christopher Pitchford Image copyright UCPI
Image caption Sir Christopher: Carrying on work for now

The chair of the undercover policing inquiry has revealed he has been diagnosed with motor neurone disease.

Sir Christopher Pitchford said his diagnosis last November meant he would eventually have to stand down from the complex and already-delayed probe.

In a personal statement, the senior judge said he regretted he would not be able to complete the inquiry's work.

The inquiry said that a successor would be identified to begin the work of taking over in due course.

The inquiry headed by the Court of Appeal judge is investigating serious allegations relating to undercover operations - some dating back 40 years.

Read full article Undercover policing inquiry chief has motor neurone disease

Undercover policing inquiry delayed amid new row

  • 15 February 2017
  • From the section UK
Scotland Yard

The long-awaited public inquiry into allegations of wrongdoing by undercover police could be delayed for years amid a growing legal row with Scotland Yard.

Newly-published documents reveal the Metropolitan Police is questioning the unprecedented size of the probe.

Read full article Undercover policing inquiry delayed amid new row

Child migrants: UK to end 'Dubs amendment' commitment

  • 8 February 2017
  • From the section UK
Lord Alf Dubs Image copyright Getty Images
Image caption Lord Dubs: Former refugee who forced government to accept plan

A key route into the UK for children caught up in Europe's migrant crisis is to close after a total of 350 arrivals.

In a written ministerial statement, the Home Office said it would stop receiving children via the so-called Dubs amendment at the end of March.

Read full article Child migrants: UK to end 'Dubs amendment' commitment

The Brexit Supreme Court case ruling explained

Gina Miller talking to the media outside the Supreme Court Image copyright Getty Images

It's done. The Supreme Court has ruled and plotted a course towards Brexit.

Amid all the division and rancour over leaving the EU, they have set out how power in the UK is separated between ministers who govern, Parliament that legislates, the devolved bodies that administer parts of the UK and lastly the role of judges in arbitrating between everyone.

So what does it all mean?

Read full article The Brexit Supreme Court case ruling explained

Brexit battle in Supreme Court: Key points

Image copyright Reuters

The UK Supreme Court has finished a historic four days of hearings on Brexit - and who has the power to trigger it. Now the 11 justices will deliberate on whether government or Parliament has that power.

We are expecting the judgement in January.


What must the Supreme Court decide?

Image copyright Getty Images
Image caption Philanthropist Gina Miller is one of two claimants to challenge the government

Read full article Brexit battle in Supreme Court: Key points

Birmingham link to Paris and Brussels attack

  • 6 December 2016
  • From the section UK
Zakaria Boufassil (left) and Mohammed Ali Ahmed Image copyright West Midlands Police
Image caption Zakaria Boufassil (left) and Mohammed Ali Ahmed will be sentenced next Monday

A man has been found guilty of giving £3,000 in Birmingham to an alleged member of the terror cell that later carried out the Paris and Brussels attacks.

Did the cash raised through benefit fraud in the UK fund the two atrocities - and what does this case tell us about the self-styled Islamic State's operations?

Read full article Birmingham link to Paris and Brussels attack

Imam loses libel action against BBC over 'extreme' claim

  • 28 October 2016
  • From the section UK
Shakeel Begg

An influential imam has lost a libel action against the BBC after a judge ruled he had promoted violence.

London-based Shakeel Begg sued after being accused on the Sunday Politics show of espousing extreme beliefs.

Read full article Imam loses libel action against BBC over 'extreme' claim

Prison violence in England and Wales up yet again

  • 27 October 2016
  • From the section UK
Pentonville Prison interior Image copyright Getty Images
Image caption HMP Pentonville: Fatal stabbing in October

Violence in jails has continued to rise, with assaults on prison officers in English and Welsh jails reaching almost 6,000 incidents a year.

The latest figures show the overall number of assaults rose by a third to 23,775 in the year to June 2016.

Read full article Prison violence in England and Wales up yet again

'IS fighter' guilty after trial held partly in secret

  • 13 October 2016
  • From the section UK
Gabriel Rasmus and Anas Abdalla: Image copyright West Midlands Police
Image caption From Left: Gabriel Rasmus, who pleaded guilty, and Anas Abdalla planned to head to Syria

A would-be Syria fighter has been convicted of trying to smuggle himself to the war zone after a semi-secret trial with claims of MI5 harassment.

Anas Abdalla had denied preparing for acts of terrorism by hiding in a lorry at Dover with another extremist.

Read full article 'IS fighter' guilty after trial held partly in secret

The imam killed because he wasn't 'Muslim enough'

  • 16 September 2016
  • From the section UK
An amulet given out in spiritual healing sessions by the imam who was later murdered
Image caption Amulet: Given out in spiritual healing sessions by the imam who was later murdered

On Friday a jury at Manchester Crown Court found Mohammed Syeedy guilty of murdering a 71-year-old imam - because he wasn't Muslim enough.

This is not just a crime that shocked the Muslim community in Rochdale where Jalal Uddin was bludgeoned to death.

Read full article The imam killed because he wasn't 'Muslim enough'