Two-thirds of teachers feel undervalued, says OECD study

Japanese calligraphy Japanese teachers work the longest hours

Fewer than a third of teachers in developed countries feel their profession is valued, according to a major international study.

But the research from the OECD reveals a wide cultural gap - with a much more positive perception of teacher status in Asia than in Europe.

Teachers in England were above average in feeling valued, at 35%, unlike France where the figure was only 5%.

The OECD's Michael Davidson described these as "shocking statistics".

The OECD, responsible for Pisa tests comparing international education standards, has turned its attention to the state of teaching, examining the working lives of 100,000 teachers and heads in 34 education systems.

The economic think-tank argues that the quality of teaching, more than any other factor, determines the outcomes of an education system.

Undervalued

But the report - Teaching and Learning International Survey (Talis) - shows that many teachers do not feel that the importance of their role is recognised.

Classroom Teachers in Europe are particularly likely to feel undervalued

Only 31% believed that their work was valued by the rest of society. The report says that has implications for attracting young teachers into the profession.

Within this average were some very wide differences. In Malaysia, South Korea, Singapore and Abu Dhabi there was a strong sense of teaching being highly respected.

In Europe, Finland was the only country where a majority of teachers were confident in the status of their job.

The Netherlands and England were the next best valued in Europe. But there was a much gloomier outlook for teachers in France, Spain and Sweden, where more than nine out of 10 teachers felt their profession was not respected.

Despite this sense of being unappreciated, there were still high levels of job satisfaction - with a large majority saying they would choose teaching again as a career choice.

Classroom behaviour

The study provides an overview of the different working weeks.

It shows that teachers in England are working 46 hours per week in term time, considerably above the international average of 38 hours, with only Singapore, 48 hours, and Japan, 54 hours, working longer.

PROFILE OF TEACHERS

  • 68% of teachers are women
  • Average age is 43
  • Singapore has youngest teachers, Italy the oldest
  • 90% are graduates
  • Average secondary school class 24 pupils
  • Average working week 38 hours, Japan longest with 54 hours

Source: OECD/ Talis study. Based on 34 education systems

In contrast, teachers in Italy are only working 29 hours per week, with Finland's teachers working 32 hours. South Korea's teachers, with some of the best test results in the world, work 37 hours per week.

The research includes a comparison of how much time is wasted in lessons because of bad behaviour.

Poland has the best behaved pupils, according to this measure, losing 8% of lesson to poor behaviour, with Brazil's pupils the most disruptive, losing 20%.

England has less of a problem with discipline than most other countries, with teachers spending 11% of lesson time on poor behaviour.

But a more detailed analysis in England's schools shows that higher achieving state schools, rated as outstanding, have less disruption and more teaching time than weaker schools. And independent schools faced less disruption than state schools.

Lesson lost to keeping discipline Teachers feeling valued Teachers' weekly working hours

Brazil 20%

Malaysia 84%

Japan 54 hours

Singapore 18%

Singapore 67%

Singapore 48 hours

France 16%

South Korea 16%

England 46 hours

Japan 15%

Finland 59%

United States 45 hours

South Korea 14%

Netherlands 40%

Sweden 42 hours

Italy 13%

England 35%

Spain 38 hours

Finland 13%

Japan 28%

Poland 37 hours

England 11%

Denmark 18%

South Korea 37 hours

Denmark 10%

Italy 13%

France 37 hours

Norway 9%

Spain 9%

Netherlands 36 hours

Estonia 9%

Sweden 5%

Finland 32 hours

Poland 8%

France 5%

Italy 29 hours

In terms of more aggressive behaviour, in Brazil, Mexico, Australia and Sweden, there are reports of regular intimidation and verbal abuse towards teachers.

The study examines how teachers are deployed - and whether the most experienced staff are where the need is greatest.

The research reveals wide differences. In South Korea, the Netherlands and Chile, all high performing education systems in their regions, the most experienced teachers are more likely to be working in schools with the most disadvantaged pupils.

In England, the trend is in the opposite direction, with the most experienced staff less likely to be in these more challenging schools.

The study also provides a profile of the teaching profession. Most are women, with the average age 43 years old.

Apart from Singapore, England has the youngest teaching force of any of the education systems in the survey. It has fewer head teachers over the age of 60 than any other developed country.

The research found that many teachers were working in isolation - a majority did not use "team teaching" with another colleague and only a third observed other teachers' lessons. Almost half did not receive any feedback from senior staff.

The report says that job satisfaction is improved by a greater sense of participation and collaborative working.

"We need to attract the best and brightest to join the profession," said Andreas Schleicher, the OECD's education director.

A spokeswoman for England's Department for Education said: "There has never been a better time to be a teacher - and there have never been more teachers in England's classrooms, with a rise of 9,000 in the last year.

"We are incredibly fortunate to have many thousands of dedicated, hard-working teachers, committed to teaching excellence. Teaching is now one of the most attractive career paths for graduates, with a record number of top graduates now joining the profession."

Labour's shadow education secretary Tristram Hunt said: "This report is more evidence that raising teacher quality improves children's learning."

He called for all teachers to be qualified and "undertake continued professional development throughout their careers".

More on This Story

More Business stories

RSS

BBC Business Live

  1.  
    UNDER EMPLOYED? 10:43: Via Twitter

    Has deputy leader of the House of Commons, Tom Brake been on holiday? His tweeting of last week's unemployment figures today seems oddly timed: "The latest unemployment figures from the ONS have been released showing a fall by 146,000, lowering total unemployment count to 2.02 million". Keep up.

     
  2.  
    AIR FRANCE 10:30:
    Passengers wait at check-in counters during Air France one-week strike

    The head of Air France-KLM, Alexandre de Juniac, has given an interview to French newspaper Le Monde saying that he was prepared to suspend until December the rollout of the Transavia low-cost operation that sparked strike action by pilots. The strike has led to severe disruption in the past week. Air France flights have been reduced to 40% of normal service.

     
  3.  
    AIR FRANCE 10:13: Breaking News

    French national airline, Air France-KLM, has announced it is putting a halt to its low-cost airline expansion plans in an attempt to end the strike by pilots that entered its second week today

     
  4.  
    TESCO PROFITS 10:10:

    Barclays Capital analyst James Anstead says although there are few details at present as to why Tesco's profits need to be restated "there is a clear implication that Tesco's previous full year trading profit guidance of £2.4bn to £2.5bn needs to be reduced. He adds: "We cannot necessarily assume that the maximum change required is £250m."

     
  5.  
    ENTREPRENEURIAL SPIRIT 09:57:

    An 18-year-old "whizzkid" with a love for the board game Monopoly is preparing an audacious bid to lead one of UK's largest retailers, according to the Daily Mail. Harris Aslam already sits on the board of Nisa Retail. He has apparently has told the group's chairman he intends to stand for election as its next chief executive.

     
  6.  
    TESCO PROFITS 09:46:

    Marks and Spencer's chief financial officer (CFO) Alan Stewart was announced as the new CFO of Tesco in July but he is still on gardening leave and is not due to join Tesco until December. Laurie McIlwee resigned as CFO in April but continued in post until just over a week ago. Over the last week there has been no CFO in the Tesco head office, the company has confirmed.

     
  7.  
    TESCO PROFITS 09:39:

    Tesco says it has informed the financial regulator, the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA), about its investigation into the reporting of its profits.

     
  8.  
    TESCO PROFITS Via Twitter Adam Parsons Business Correspondent

    tweets: "Tesco won't confirm my revelation that Chris Bush has stepped aside. But will confirm that Robin Terrell is now doing his job!"

     
  9.  
    TESCO PROFITS 09:31:

    Tesco chairman Richard Broadbent says the retailer's investigation is focusing on the reporting of payments made to Tesco from its suppliers. It seems to be an issue of the timing of payments, rather than a "hole" in the accounts.

     
  10.  
    TESCO PROFITS 09:18:

    Dave Lewis, Tesco chief executive, will not confirm that Chris Bush the managing director is one of the four executives suspended as part of its investigation into its profits reporting. He is speaking to journalists on a conference call.

     
  11.  
    MARKET UPDATE 09:16:

    Aside from Tesco the FTSE 100 index is lower by 0.66% at 6,792 just over an hour into the trading day. Tesco is perhaps unsurprisingly the biggest faller. Meanwhile, engineering firm Petrofac is the biggest riser, up 1.72% to 1066p.

     
  12.  
    TESCO SHARES 09:11:

    Tesco's share price is beginning to stabilise a little. Having fallen 11.3% on the open to 203.5p, Tesco shares are currently trading 7.99% lower at 211.25p

     
  13.  
    TESCO PROFITS 09:01: BBC Radio 4

    James Bevan, chief investment officer at CCLA Investment Management, tells Today the profit warning from Tesco could amount to falsifying accounts. "They have decided to account for profits arising in future periods in the current period, and deferred costs that otherwise should have been recognised. That's really serious."

     
  14.  
    TESCO PROFITS 08:57: Via Email

    Richard Hunter, head of equities at Hargreaves Lansdown, says Tesco's profit warning "does not come close to jeopardising overall profitability" at the supermarket, and the market will be happy that at least the bad news is out in the open and being dealt with.

     
  15.  
    UK ECONOMY 08:44: BBC Breakfast
    Jeremy Cook

    Breakfast's Steph McGovern is down in London in the financial district talking to Jeremy Cook, chief economist at World First foreign exchange, who says we should be focusing on how strong the UK economy is following the Scottish referendum. Unemployment is down, GDP is growing - "all very very good news".

     
  16.  
    TESCO PROFITS Via Twitter

    Sean Farrell on the Guardian's City Desk tweets: "Tesco CEO Lewis: 'This is not in the ordinary course of events. This has been audited by a big reputable firm.'

     
  17.  
    HEADLINES
  18.  
    TESCO PROFITS 08:35: Radio 5 live

    Four senior Tesco executives including the UK managing director Chris Bush have been suspended, while an investigation into profits reporting is carried out, Adam Parsons says on Radio 5 live. The share price has recovered a bit but is still down more than 9%.

     
  19.  
    MINIMUM WAGE 08:21: Radio 5 live

    Shane Brennan from the Association of Convenience Stores says the minimum wage is becoming a "political football" between the main political parties, and warns a rise could hit employees negatively. "When the minimum wage goes up, small retailers cut back on the hours they offer staff," he tells Radio 5 live.

     
  20.  
    CHILD BENEFIT 08:18: Radio 5 live

    Ed Balls is talking about the minimum wage on 5 live Breakfast, but he keeps falling off the air. He was half way through explaining how the Labour party wants to extend the child benefit cap - one of those "difficult decisions" necessary to "balance the books".

     
  21.  
    TESCO SHARES 08:14:

    Tesco's shares opened down 11.3% at 203.5p - that's its lowest price since May 2003 - more than a decade ago.

     
  22.  
    TESCO SHARES 08:09: Breaking News

    Tesco's share price falls by more than 10% in the first few minutes of trading in London.

     
  23.  
    MOSS BROS PROFITS 08:04:

    Menswear retailer Moss Bros has reported a pre-tax profit of £1.95m for the six months to July. That's slightly lower than their previous guidance and reflects the number of stores that were closed for refit in the first half of this year, the company said. Like for like sales were 6.4% higher.

     
  24.  
    TESCO PROFITS Via Twitter Robert Peston Economics editor

    tweets: "Tesco! Oh my giddy aunt. Never thought it would come to this http://www.investegate.co.uk/tesco-plc--tsco-/rns/trading-update/201409220700142186S/ …

     
  25.  
    ALIBABA 07:55:
    Alibaba

    The Financial Times reports that Alibaba, the Chinese ecommerce group, has boosted the value of its IPO to $25bn (£15bn) by selling extra shares. That makes it the biggest IPO in history. Huge investor demand saw the company's share price surge 38% on its debut on the New York Stock Exchange on Friday.

     
  26.  
    TESCO PROFITS Via Twitter

    Richard Hunter from stockbrokers Hargreaves Lansdown tweets: "Profit warning on a profit warning for #Tesco likely to put further pressure on a share price already down 39% over the last year"

     
  27.  
    STOCK MARKET FLOAT 07:47:

    Other news from the stock market this morning: British bank Aldermore says it will float on the London Stock Exchange in October, aiming to raise £75m. Aldermore focuses on lending to small and medium-sized businesses and homeowners.

     
  28.  
    TESCO PROFITS Via Twitter Adam Parsons Business Correspondent

    tweets: "Dave Lewis initiated inquiry over weekend. Am told Philip Clarke has officially left Tesco, but remains available to talk to investigation."

     
  29.  
    PHONES 4U RESCUE 07:36:
    The Phones 4U shop sign.

    Phone network EE is to buy 58 Phones 4U stores - safeguarding 359 jobs - in a deal with administrator PricewaterhouseCoopers. The phone network was known to have entered negotiations over the weekend. On Friday Vodafone agreed to take over 140 Phones 4U shops.

     
  30.  
    TESCO PROFITS Via Twitter Adam Parsons Business Correspondent

    tweets: "Tesco were due to report Interims next week. That has now been cancelled."

     
  31.  
    LABOUR CONFERENCE 07:26: BBC Radio 4

    Labour shadow business secretary Chuka Umanna tells Today Labour is pro-business, but says: "What we have been clear about is we can't go back to business as usual and the kind of fast buck culture we saw in some parts of the economy that helped contribute to the 2008/09 crash."

     
  32.  
    TESCO PROFITS Via Twitter

    City grandee David Buik tweets: "It never rains but it pours dear old Tesco. It appears profits have been over-stated by £250 mn - shares could be down 5% at the opening."

     
  33.  
    TESCO PROFITS 07:15:
    A group of Tesco shopping trolleys

    "We have uncovered a serious issue and have responded accordingly," said Dave Lewis, who took over as the boss of Tesco last month. "The chairman and I have acted quickly to establish a comprehensive independent investigation. The board, my colleagues, our customers and I expect Tesco to operate with integrity and transparency and we will take decisive action as the results of the investigation become clear."

     
  34.  
    TESCO PROFITS 07:11: Breaking News

    Tesco has released a statement saying it over-stated its expected profit for the six months to 23 August. In a trading statement on 29 August it said it expected half-year profits to be £1.1bn. It has now revised this down by £250m.

     
  35.  
    LISTEN AGAIN Via Twitter Adam Parsons Business Correspondent

    tweets: The #WUTM podcast. All yours: bbc.co.uk/podcasts/serie…

     
  36.  
    AIR FRANCE 07:03:
    Air France planes

    Pilots at Air France are looking ahead to a second week on strike this morning. France's transport minister Alain Vidalies says the fate of Air France is at stake in the dispute. Pilots are angry that the airline is expanding its budget carrier, which pays pilots less.

     
  37.  
    LABOUR ANTI-BUSINESS? 06:55: BBC Radio 4

    Lord Jones tells Today that Labour has not given business the credit it deserves. "Without the wealth that business creates you have no public sector, you have no taxation, you don't have one job in the country. That's how important business is," he says.

     
  38.  
    LABOUR ANTI-BUSINESS? 06:51: BBC Radio 4
    Digby Jones

    Lord Digby Jones, former head of the CBI and member of the last Labour government tells Today that Labour is casting doubt on its support for the UK business community. "Whatever the current shadow cabinet say - let's nationalise the banks, let's have a social market in energy, lets increase business taxes, whatever it may be - they are showing by their actions that they actually don't get it," he says.

     
  39.  
    DEVOLUTION 06:42: Radio 5 live

    Wake Up to Money has been discussing the prospects for more devolution across the UK in the wake of the "No" vote in Scotland. Tony Travers from the London School of Economics says the UK is one of the most centralised democracies in the world - 95% of tax revenues go straight to the exchequer.

     
  40.  
    MINIMUM WAGE 06:35: BBC Radio 4

    Is Labour leader Ed Miliband's pledge to raise the minimum wage to £8 per hour by 2020 anti-business?Simon Walker, head of the Institute of Directors, tells the Today programme he shares many of the Labour party's concerns - on energy prices, zero-hours contracts and wages. "But... we don't agree with Labour's instinct to legislate or regulate on these matters," he says.

     
  41.  
    MARKETS 06:29: BBC Breakfast
    Breakfast

    Breakfast's Steph McGovern is in the City in London before dawn this morning, talking to analysts and market traders about what's moving the markets after the "No" vote in Scotland last week. She'll be talking to a currency trader later to find out what's going to happen to the pound.

     
  42.  
    MINIMUM WAGE 06:18:

    Labour's leader Ed Miliband says Labour will put the minimum wage up to £8 an hour if they win the election next year - up from the £6.50 is due to rise to this October. The unions say that's not enough, and want £10 an hour, while the CBI warns any rise will "put jobs at risk".

     
  43.  
    LABOUR CONFERENCE 06:12:
    Labour shadow  chancellor Ed Balls

    Ed Balls is expected to say that Labour will reinstate the 50 top rate of tax in his speech to the party conference later today. That's not necessarily news. But Labour haven't been completely clear on whether they would reinstate the 50p tax band until now. The inclusion of the proposal essentially amounts to an election promise eight months out from the general election.

     
  44.  
    Phones 4U 06:02: Radio 5 live

    EE has confirmed it's looking into buy a few of those Phones 4 U shops now on the market. Judy Palmer from Begbies Traynor defends EE and Vodafone, the operators accused of helping to put the mobile retailer out of business, on Wake Up to Money calling their actions "commercial hardball".

     
  45.  
    06:01: Edwin Lane Business reporter, BBC News

    Hello all. We're also getting the latest on the fate of Phones 4U, after it went into administration last week. Get in touch with us on bizlivepage@bbc.co.uk or tweet us @BBCBusiness.

     
  46.  
    0600: Matthew West Business Reporter

    Morning folks. We start the day with news that luxury shoe brand Jimmy Choo is looking at a stock market float in London, there are also half year results from Moss Bros. The Labour party conference goes into its second full day with a speech from shadow chancellor Ed Balls. It's his last conference speech before the election so we'll bring you any nuggets from that too. Stay with us.

     

Features

BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.