Male bonuses double those of women, says study

 
Male and female executives On average women receive less than half the amount of bonus that men do

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The pay gap between men and women is exacerbated by bonus payments given to male managers which are on average double those for women, says the Chartered Management Institute (CMI).

Male managers' average extra payments were £6,442 last year compared with £3,029 for women.

The CMI said their salaries were already almost 25% higher than women's.

Its study, of 43,000 managers, showed that men would earn £141,000 more in bonuses over a lifetime.

At more senior levels, the pay gap for both basic pay and bonuses, increased.

Women directors' average bonus is £36,270, while men receive £63,700.

Loss

The chief executive of the CMI, Ann Francke, said: "Despite genuine efforts to get more women onto boards, it's disappointing to find that not only has progress stalled, but women are also losing ground at senior levels.

CMI chief executive Ann Francke : "Organisations that have more diversity at the top perform better"

"Women are the majority of the workforce at entry level but still lose out on top positions and top pay. The time has come to tackle this situation more systemically."

She said businesses would lose out in terms of growth, employee engagement, and more ethical management cultures.

Labour's shadow minister for women and equalities, Yvette Cooper, said: "It's disgraceful that the corporate gender pay gap seems to be getting wider rather than narrowing.

"Women executives already only get three-quarters of the pay of male executives in similar jobs. And now this research shows women managers are only getting half the bonuses too.

"It is in the interests of business and the economy for women's talents to be valued and promoted. And it's high time that women were fairly rewarded. Instead, once again, it looks like the clock is being turned back."

Target

Start Quote

The law is important and needs to be strengthened and simplified for it to be effective”

End Quote Geraldine Healy Professor of employment relations

Earlier this year, Boardwatch UK recorded the first fall in the percentage of women on boards since the figures were first complied in 1999.

Lord Davies, who conducted a review into the gender balance on company boards in 2011 set a target for 25% women to be reached by 2015. The current representation is 17%.

The study was assisted by the salary specialists XpertHR.

Mark Crail, from XpertHR, said: "There is no good reason for men to still be earning more in bonuses than women when they are in very similar jobs.

"But it's often the case that men and women have different career paths, with 'male' roles more likely to attract bonuses.

"While women are generally getting lower bonuses than men, especially at senior levels, they may be entering occupations where there is less of a culture of bonus payments. The question for employers is why that's the case."

Separately, the Office for National Statistics reported on Tuesday that total bonus payments across the whole UK economy in the year to end-March were £36.9bn, a 1% rise on the previous 12 months.

The total equates to an average of about £1,400 per employee.

The ONS said that £13.3bn was paid in the finance and insurance sector, virtually the same as the previous year.

Sectors that saw a rise in bonuses included the communication, retail, and transport industries.

 

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  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 283.

    Here's an idea. How about some BBC stories on the following inequalities
    1. Shorter life expectancy for men
    2. Later state retirement ages for men
    3. Relative underperformance of boys at school (NB especially the white working class)
    4. Male under-representation in many roles especially healthcare-related
    5. Under-representation of Prostate Cancer versus Breast Cancer

    No? Well, fancy that.

  • rate this
    +14

    Comment number 282.

    Until men and women have equal rights to maternity and paternity pay (making men just as "dangerous" to employ as females), and attitudes catch up with the fact that either parent could be the best choice to be at home, I can't see this improving.

  • rate this
    +3

    Comment number 281.

    @269
    _
    Do you know any good male comedians?

    See thing about that is it's entirely your taste, their are many female comedians who many people consider good

    The fault is at your end me thinks. The fault is in your definitions of funny and good. Get over the fact you have a 3 growths that hang around in your pants dictating 99% of the course of your life and look at the world as a whole. Use brain

  • rate this
    +2

    Comment number 280.

    Hey Colin, I'm hilarious so there! My husband won't even attempt joke-telling, there's only room for 1 clown in my circus so his role is largely "serious", "tidy"and when in polite company "straight man" I think I might be a bloke, I also fix the photo copiers at work and remove wasps at the behest of hysterical arm flapping women (& one man)

  • rate this
    +2

    Comment number 279.

    I still can not understand why any of these people need a bonus to do a job of work where they are paid a good salary
    Because even when they do the job badly they still get a bonus
    We would be down the road with our P45.
    Or re negotiating a new REDUCED salary with a review after 6 months.
    If we all started demanding bonuses for the jobs we do we would soon price ourselves out of work.

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 278.

    @276 I named them, as requested, now go wipe that egg off your face then back to those goalposts you need to move - again.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 277.

    A good argument to cut male bonuses.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 276.

    @271. Yours In Sisterhood


    I was really talking about present day comedians and its not a very good list really, is it? Pamela Stephenson? Tracey Ullman? Oh dear .. need to do better

  • rate this
    -1

    Comment number 275.

    @267
    Now there is a point, if it's not considered okay for the FA to have mixed sex teams, what about letting the women be the manager of the boys team. :P Or a female England head coach of the England team. Or can they only be manager of team laundry services? Change has to come in the most publicly visible places to be noted and built upon by others. Or sex strike, no sex till the boys play fair

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 274.

    Women get lower rewards because men are in control, it really is as simple as that. No right but at present, true.

  • rate this
    -1

    Comment number 273.

    What's a bonus?, is that something bankers get for doing such a wonderful job?

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 272.

    I don't see why this matters, once they bring the cash home, it is disproportionately spread between the family members.

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 271.

    @269

    Well to name a few - Dawn French, Jennifer Saunders, Catherine Tate, Sarah Millican, Tracey Ullman & Pamela Stephenson. Imagine they could come up with some great gags about this story.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 270.

    Luke Caster
    I am your exception! I'm the one my boss relies on to work. I will say it does rely too on an understanding partner. My hubby is a workaholic so the number of hours I put in is not an issue. With kids I could never do this though, I would never expect society to work around me. As a general rule though I do agree, men are more likely to put more in and are expected to do more.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 269.

    266.
    JohnBA
    'The problem with men is they think they are funny and think hitting balls into holes on the big lawn is important.
    :)'

    Men are funny, women aren't. Know any decent female comedians? But yes, golf is awful
    :)

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 268.

    Men only get more money than women because they have traditionally been more physically able bodied to do certain types of work. Whereas times have now changed and physical labour has declined and women and men have adopted similar roles, the psychology of men getting more remains.

    We need to see more women going on strike, this too has been dominated historically by male professions.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 267.

    Its nice to see female football managers getting the same treatment as their male counterparts.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 266.

    @264. colinwe
    Its more a case of men not taking this non-sense seriously, hence the put downs. The problem with feminists is they have no sense of humour, which is probably why they don't advance in the boardroom. That and the fact they can't play golf.
    _
    The problem with men is they think they are funny and think hitting balls into holes on the big lawn is important.

    :)

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 265.

    "There is no good reason for men to still be earning more in bonuses than women when they are in very similar jobs”

    Really?

    So, length of time with the company doesn't count?

    Or, more and higher qualifications?

    Or, more experience?

    Or, punctuality?

    Or, lengthy career breaks?

    Or, ability to do the job well?

    Or, longer working hours?

    Or, attitude?

    etc.

  • rate this
    -1

    Comment number 264.

    259. CTM87
    'This discussion thread is surely some evidence that while the law may have changed, attitudes certainly haven't.'


    Its more a case of men not taking this non-sense seriously, hence the put downs. The problem with feminists is they have no sense of humour, which is probably why they don't advance in the boardroom. That and the fact they can't play golf.

 

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