Chrysler to recall 840,000 vehicles

Jeep Grand Cherokee Chrysler has already agreed to recall 2.7 million jeeps over concerns of fuel tank fires

US carmaker Chrysler has said that it will recall nearly 840,000 vehicles.

This includes 490,000 vehicles which may have a potentially faulty component for head rests that are designed to move forward during rear-end crashes.

It is recalling 282,000 minivans to fix software which is "inadvertently programmed" to deploy side airbags on the opposite side to that of an impact.

Chrysler said there had been three reported incidents and one "minor" injury due to the airbag issue.

However, it added that it was not aware of any incident or injuries related to the head rest issue.

The carmaker said that the active head restraints are designed to mitigate neck injuries by automatically moving forward during certain rear-impact collisions.

It said that faulty microcontrollers in some vehicles "may prevent the systems from functioning properly".

'Aggressive quality control'

Other recalls include 69,000 trucks to update their electronic stability control software, and 1,060 commercial trucks - half of which are with the dealers - to inspect and if necessary replace a track-bar fastener.

It is also recalling 226 of minivans made in 2013 - most of which it said are in dealer hands - to replace their airbag-control modules.

Chrysler said "the modules were inadvertently programmed with software that may compromise airbag deployment" but added that it was not aware of any injuries or incident due to the issue.

Eric Mayne, a spokesman for Chrysler said that the recalls were "an indication of our aggressive quality control protocol".

The majority of the vehicles impacted by the recall are in North America.

Last month, Chrysler agreed to recall 2.7 million Jeeps that could be at risk of fuel tank fires, after initially refusing a government request to do so.

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