Horsemeat scandal 'changing shoppers' habits'

 

Some shoppers explain why they are changing their buying habits

More than half of UK consumers have changed their shopping habits as a result of the horsemeat scandal, a consumer group survey suggests.

The survey by Which? found that 60% of 2,000 adults questioned online had changed how they shop, with many now buying less processed meat.

It also suggested that public trust in the food industry had declined.

Horsemeat has been found in a number of processed beef products across Europe, raising questions about the food chain.

Executive director of Which? Richard Lloyd: "There has been a collapse in confidence in the food industry"

"The horsemeat scandal exposed the need for urgent changes to the way food fraud is detected and standards are enforced," said Which? executive director Richard Lloyd.

Some 68% of those surveyed do not think the government has been giving enough attention to enforcing labelling laws, with half of consumers not confident ingredient information is accurate.

"These serious failings must be put right if consumers are to feel fully confident in the food they are buying once more," Mr Lloyd said.

The scandal began in January when Irish food inspectors announced that they had found horsemeat in frozen beef burgers made by firms in Ireland and the UK, and sold by a number of UK supermarket chains, including Tesco, Iceland, Aldi and Lidl.

Since then beef products containing horsemeat have been found in a number of European countries, including France, Norway, Austria, Switzerland, Sweden and Germany.

UK Prime Minister David Cameron told Parliamentary select committee chairmen and women on Tuesday that the Food Standards Agency (FSA), the government and retailers all had lessons to learn.

 

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  • rate this
    +5

    Comment number 593.

    As the owner of exoticmeats.co.uk we sell horse meat and have seen a significant rise in orders over the past 2 months of not only horse but all of our meats.
    Our customers want meat from sources they can trust and know to be safe, the problem is that the retailers have lied about what is in their meat, if i had done that i would now be showering with Chris Huhne.

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 592.

    The supermarkets have a lot to answer for (or is it us for putting up with it?), including pre-packaged meat on display, which seems to be pumped full of water. I recently bought some stewing beef in a plastic tray, which looked quite lean until I opened the package and turned it over - all the fat was on the bottom, out of sight. Local butchers have similar prices, with better meat.

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 591.

    @586 GRUMPY51

    I think you'll find Tesco do Tiger. . . . . .Sainsbury do Giraffe ;)

  • rate this
    +2

    Comment number 590.

    Wow, Tesco's have boght Giraffe........... something different in the burgers from horse then?

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 589.

    Presumably horse meat was used at it was/is cheaper than beef. If this is the case with the appropriate health & safety standards why not sell the stuff appropriately labelled ? I have never knowingly eaten horse but would have no objection to doing so if properly regulated.

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 588.

    20yrs ago I studied agric.& saw the meat processing at first hand,it was not pretty.Now 10 sausages/4 burgers for a £1,a Mars BAR 75p,You get what you pay for.Supermarkets drive up cost, whilst elongating the supply chain costs,& quality is sacrificed.3kg RIB roast in UK £40+, in Eire €22 killed at butchers, from local farm.Supermarket quality & price can be beaten. Convenience costs dearly

  • rate this
    +4

    Comment number 587.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the HORSE rules. Explain.

  • rate this
    +2

    Comment number 586.

    Good to see that Tesco are now expanding their range into Giraffe! Probably not the best time for thisacquisition.

  • rate this
    -1

    Comment number 585.

    All this horse meat fiasco got me thinking...... 'I wonder where Shergar ended!

    Lord have mercy!

  • rate this
    +3

    Comment number 584.

    578. surfingkenny
    ..also its horse dna/meat its not minced babies in the products.

    They were only testing for horse dna.
    This time.

  • rate this
    -3

    Comment number 583.

    Of all the things that affect us today - like Section 5 and its de facto attack on free speech, government's complete abandon on the issue of people trafficking, etc. - I have to say that the occasional horse galloping onto my dinner plate is an outsider odds-wise. Some food stuff will apparently shorten our lives today, but next week another, so it has had no impact on my shopping habits.

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 582.

    This is great news. It's about time people really started thinking about the fuel they put in their bodies. This is a fundamental part of existence, and the quality of your food and water should be priority number one! It's not about whether horse meat is good or bad, it's about being lied to and having no idea what COULD be in our food. I hope this is the end of people eating swill.

  • rate this
    +5

    Comment number 581.

    @572 RBL

    Just to recap - our "benefit scroungers" cost far less than the loss of tax being unpaid by large corporations. Why don't you have a rant against them instead ?

  • rate this
    -1

    Comment number 580.

    Is there actually any point in changing your eating habits when you still don't know 100% what is in your food or how it is described to you? You buy a steak from the local butcher, are you 100% it's beef?, you buy eggs, do you really know if its caged or free range? You buy vegetables, is it a gm crop? has it got chemical fertiliser and pesticides on it?

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 579.

    Must admit I was a bit surprised when this all kicked off,especially as it's pretty obvious we've been led by,and now dictated to,by 600 odd vegetables for the last 30 years or so,if not longer.

  • rate this
    -1

    Comment number 578.

    No it hasnt, i wouldnt have ever bought value meat products. not being funny but a 4 pack of burgers for 75p... its not like beef would be in it eh? what do people expect. also its horse dna/meat its not minced babies in the products. no ones gonna die from it. a sausage contains more junk that you can list on here. where is the drama. if you wwant meat go to a butcher not tesco.

  • rate this
    -3

    Comment number 577.

    Cows do nothing but sit in fields all day, doing jack. Some of those horses ran in the Grand National, clearly they were active and looked after very well. Which would you rather eat?
    You'd be grateful for this cheaper and healthier alternative when Foot and Mouth strikes again.

  • rate this
    +2

    Comment number 576.

    I, for one, have asked my butcher to get me some fresh horse meat. Eaten it many times and its delicious - far leaner and better for you than beef. But I do want what it says on the packet, anything else is fraud.

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 575.

    They should just label the products 'meat pie', 'meat burger' etc. They've done a similar thing with non-premium fish for decades. Who knows if we've been eating seahorses in our fishfingers?

  • rate this
    +2

    Comment number 574.

    First horses now Tesco's buying giraffe?

 

Page 8 of 37

 

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