Apple Samsung patent trial: jury begins deliberations

Apple and Samsung tablets in Düsseldorf courthouse Apple and Samsung are embroiled in legal battles all over the world

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The jury has begun deliberating in the US patent trial between the two biggest smartphone-makers in the world, Samsung and Apple.

Apple lawyers accused South Korea-based Samsung of copying Apple designs after realising it could not compete.

Samsung lawyers said a win for Apple would mean less choice for consumers.

Apple is asking for more than $2.5bn (£1.6bn) in damages from Samsung for violating its patented designs and features in the iPad and iPhone.

Apple is also asking for a ban on sales of Samsung tablets and smartphones.

In return, Samsung has counter-sued, saying Apple infringed its patents for key wireless technology.

In his closing argument on Tuesday, Apple lawyer Harold McElhinny told the jury that Samsung had employed a shortcut in its product design.

"In those critical three months, Samsung was able to copy and incorporate the result of Apple's four-year investment in hard work and ingenuity- without taking any of the risks," McElhinny said referring to the time spent working on Samsung phones by a South Korean designer who testified in the trial.

For his part, Samsung's lawyer Charles Verhoeven told the jury a verdict in favour of Apple meant competition would be stifled in the industry.

"Rather than competing in the marketplace, Apple is seeking a competitive edge in the courtroom," Verhoeven said in his closing statement.

"(Apple thinks) it's entitled to having a monopoly on a rounded rectangle with a large screen. It's amazing really."

The closely watched trial has drawn worldwide attention and on Tuesday the courtroom was overflowing with observers, journalists, lawyers and analysts.

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