Newspaper headlines: 'Families hail Hillsborough decision'

  • 29 June 2017
Guardian front page
Image caption The Guardian leads on six people, including two former senior police officers, being charged over the 1989 Hillsborough disaster. Prosecutors will allege that police match commander David Duckenfield's failure to take personal responsibility on the day was "extraordinarily bad and contributed substantially to the deaths of each of those 96 people who so tragically and unnecessarily lost their lives", reports the Guardian.
Telegraph front page
Image caption The Daily Telegraph describes how the victims' families broke into applause at being told former chief superintendent Mr Duckenfield and retired chief constable Sir Norman Bettison would be facing criminal charges.
Mirror front page
Image caption The Daily Mirror's front page features the faces of the 95 Liverpool football fans whom Mr Duckenfield faces manslaughter charges against. The 96th victim died too late for manslaughter charges to be brought.
Times front page
Image caption The Times' focus is on the appointment of the head of the public inquiry into the Grenfell Tower fire disaster. The paper notes that Sir Martin Moore-Bick is widely respected among the judiciary but there is sensitivity about appointing a judge who in 2014 allowed a council to rehouse a woman 50 miles from home, a ruling that was later overturned by the Supreme Court.
Metro front page
Image caption The Metro says Theresa May survived a crunch vote as MPs came close to ending seven years of austerity. A defeated Labour bid to scrap the 1% public sector pay cap came after Downing Street was forced to backtrack on comments that suggested the government was ready to "relax the reins on wages".
Financial Times front page
Image caption The Financial Times says bond and currency markets whip-sawed as Europe's two most influential central bankers, Bank of England Governor Mark Carney and the European Central Bank's Mario Draghi, struggled to communicate to investors how they would exit from years of crisis-era economic stimulus policies.
Mail front page
Image caption The Daily Mail follows up its front-page lead on Wednesday - about two Romanian fugitives who cannot be extradited because jail cells there are too small - with the headline: "Beyond satire (part two)." The paper reports that security chiefs were facing questions over how a hate preacher suspected of radicalising one of the Paris terrorists was allowed to live in Britain for two years.

The news that six men are to face criminal charges over the Hillsborough disaster dominates many of the front pages.

Most of the headlines reflect the long passage of time since the tragedy.

"Twenty-eight years on, six face trial," is the headline in the Guardian.

The Daily Telegraph's headline quotes the chairwoman of the Hillsborough Family Support Group, Margaret Aspinall, as describing the announcement as "the beginning of the end".

Image copyright EPA

The Daily Mirror's is "95 manslaughter charges", with the nine and the five figures made up of pictures of the Liverpool fans who died in April 1989.

Read full article Newspaper headlines: 'Families hail Hillsborough decision'

Newspaper headlines: 'May's top team splits over Brexit'

  • 28 June 2017

The Times leads with claims which appear in several papers that Theresa May's "top team" are split over Brexit.

It says the prime minister appears to be struggling to contain differences between Brexit Secretary David Davis and Chancellor Philip Hammond.

Read full article Newspaper headlines: 'May's top team splits over Brexit'

Newspaper headlines: DUP deal dominates front pages

  • 27 June 2017
Theresa May and Arlene Foster Image copyright AFP
Image caption Prime Minister Theresa May and DUP leader Arlene Foster

Many of the papers feature pictures of Theresa May and Arlene Foster after the DUP leader reached an agreement to support a minority Conservative government.

"Thanks a billion," is the i's headline, referring to the financial benefits that Northern Ireland will receive in the deal.

Read full article Newspaper headlines: DUP deal dominates front pages

Newspaper headlines: Jeremy Corbyn says he will be 'PM in six months'

  • 26 June 2017
David Davis

The Times says thousands of European criminals will face deportation after Brexit, because they won't be eligible to be granted "settled status" allowing them to stay in the UK.

The inability to expel such criminals "has long enraged ministers", according to the paper, which says those affected are likely to include people convicted of violence, and sex and drug offenders.

Read full article Newspaper headlines: Jeremy Corbyn says he will be 'PM in six months'

Newspaper headlines: 'I wanted out' says Prince Harry

  • 25 June 2017
Image copyright PA

The Mail on Sunday says Prince Harry once "wanted out" of the Royal Family, and considered living an "ordinary" life.

In an interview, Harry says that when he was at Eton he just wanted to be a "bad boy" - and after he left the army he didn't want to grow up.

Read full article Newspaper headlines: 'I wanted out' says Prince Harry

Newspaper headlines: Armed police, flat evacuations and Brexit

  • 24 June 2017
Image copyright EPA

According to the Daily Mirror, fridge-freezers similar to the one that's thought to have sparked the Grenfell Tower blaze can burst into flames in as little as 90 seconds.

The Daily Telegraph highlights urgent fire tests taking place at hospitals. It says research has found that £561m of taxpayers money has been spent since 2014 on public sector contracts that contain references to cladding.

Read full article Newspaper headlines: Armed police, flat evacuations and Brexit

Newspaper headlines: Tower 'death traps' and EU migrant rights

  • 23 June 2017
Theresa May Image copyright Reuters

The Financial Times says Theresa May's offer to Brussels to allow three million EU citizens to stay in the UK shows a "weakened" prime minister, trying to regain the initiative on Brexit.

According to the FT, diplomats are privately raising the prospect of her proving unable to deliver Brexit with a hung Parliament and a divided cabinet.

Read full article Newspaper headlines: Tower 'death traps' and EU migrant rights

Newspaper headlines: Brexit 'crisis' and Prince Harry's claim

  • 22 June 2017
Queen Elizabeth and Prince Charles as the Queen delivers her speech in Parliament Image copyright Getty Images

There is plenty of analysis of a Queen's Speech which, according to the Guardian, amounted to an "empty programme" from a government that lacks authority.

It was so short, says the Daily Mirror, that asking the Queen to delay Ascot to read it felt almost cruel. After all the red pen, Theresa May had barely enough left for a tweet.

Read full article Newspaper headlines: Brexit 'crisis' and Prince Harry's claim