Difficulties of getting fit if you're disabled

  • 28 August 2015
Kris teaching a gym class. Amputee model Jack Eyers is there and apart from Kris they are all doing a punching movement while sitting on gym balls
Image caption Kris Saunders-Stowe teaching a gym class

My favourite thing about being disabled has always been that no-one expects me to do any exercise.

I have cerebral palsy (CP) and the assumption that I couldn't take part in sport while growing up was one I was happy to embrace because I hate physical exercise.

So imagine my frustration when Paralympics 2012 came to London and disabled people the world over seemed to be getting sporty. Every other taxi driver would ask me if I was going to take up sprinting.

Though the Paralympics loomed large, it turns out I am not the only disabled person who dislikes taking part in sport. According to new research by Scope, although most disabled people think the London Paralympics showed they can achieve great things, only 5% of them were actually inspired to do more exercise or sport after the games.

The thing about having CP is that I never had to think about keeping fit very much. The way I walk is exhausting, and has always been a workout in itself. As a result, I have spent most of my life being very thin without even trying. For people with CP, this isn't uncommon: there was even a Facebook group called Why Diet When You Can Have Cerebral Palsy? where we'd share our outrageously decadent calorific dinner plans and then laugh about how we planned to burn it all off tomorrow, simply by walking a bit.

Read full article Difficulties of getting fit if you're disabled

Did BBC3's disability season hit the mark?

  • 20 August 2015
Defying the Label website image

BBC Three's Defying the Label season came to an end last week. But did it hit the mark? Disabled journalist Frances Ryan thinks it did.

If you caught even part of BBC Three's Defying the Label season - the channel's biggest ever season of disability related programming - it was easy to sense the relish of the commissioning editors. Over the past month, there have been 15 specialist documentaries, current affairs features, a factual drama and a comedy panel game show that covered topics ranging from sex and relationships to hate crime. At times, it was as if BBC Three felt they were single-handedly filling in the wasteland of mainstream coverage of disability. Perhaps they were.

Read full article Did BBC3's disability season hit the mark?

Better diagnosis call for adults with ADHD

  • 17 August 2015

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in adults is a "hidden" problem that needs better diagnosis, the charity for people with the condition, Addiss, has said. How does it affect adults' lives?

"I wake up every morning a new woman. I think, 'Today is the day I'm going to do everything right and get on top of the important things instead of [procrastinating].'

Read full article Better diagnosis call for adults with ADHD

Ten years of being a disabled comedian at the Edinburgh Fringe Festival

  • 15 August 2015
Simon with two other members of Abnormally Funny People

A lot has changed in the past decade when it comes to disabled comedians and the types of shows that audiences expect. Are we becoming more mainstream?

The cleaners visited our rented apartment here in Edinburgh yesterday to change the bed linen and bring fresh towels. That means I have now been at the Edinburgh Fringe Festival for a week. It's hard to keep track as the days are an identical routine of practising for our comedy show: Abnormally Funny People.

Read full article Ten years of being a disabled comedian at the Edinburgh Fringe Festival

The family who built a cafe just for their son

  • 13 August 2015
Jose and Ysabella at the counter

A cafe in the Philippines is giving disabled people in the area a chance to succeed in life and break down stigma in the process.

Jose Canoy was 12 when his family realised that he would no longer do well in school.

Read full article The family who built a cafe just for their son

Team GB footballers go for gold at the Special Olympics

  • 7 August 2015

Twenty-five-year-old Ben Kelly from Watford has been competing for Team GB in the 11-a-side football competition at the Special Olympics in Los Angeles.

For Ben, who has a learning difficulty and always wanted to play for his country, this has been a dream come true.

Read full article Team GB footballers go for gold at the Special Olympics

Viewpoint: Living and learning at a disabled-only college

  • 6 August 2015
Four of the National Star students

At the National Star college in Gloucestershire, all the students have a disability. What is life like at a disabled-only college?

There are 170 young adults in each year group at the National Star college in Cheltenham. They come from all over the UK to start three years living, learning, and loving on campus.

Read full article Viewpoint: Living and learning at a disabled-only college

Breaking Bad's RJ Mitte on showbiz and disability

  • 5 August 2015
Before the podcast - guests and presenters

On this month's Ouch Talk Show we come to you from the capital of showbiz, Los Angeles.

Presenter Kate Monaghan is joined by guest presenter, actor and British ex-pat Shannon Murray, to talk about roles and representation with three disabled people at the forefront of the entertainment industry. Star of Sony Pictures' Breaking Bad and ABC Family's prime-time drama Switched at Birth RJ Mitte chats about his latest role playing a character who, unlike Mitte, is not disabled, and we get a rare glimpse in to his own family life.

Read full article Breaking Bad's RJ Mitte on showbiz and disability

Disabled in an instant

  • 3 August 2015
Peter

Those who become disabled very suddenly have to confront a care system they know nothing about and which some people feel hinders rather than helps. Peter Mitchell met three disabled people for whom this is the case.

It was always a dream of mine to become a professional footballer. And then, in July 2000, it came true. I signed a contract with Leeds Utd and was just starting my third season with the club when I was in a car crash which broke my back.

Read full article Disabled in an instant

Finding a suitable personal assistant if you're disabled

  • 1 August 2015
Rupy

When the relationship between a disabled person and their assistant works well, it can be fantastic. When it doesn't, it can be disastrous, says Rupy Kaur.

I first became an employer at 15 during my GCSEs - an additional stress most young people don't have to think about. I needed to take on a personal assistant (PA) to help me with daily care tasks like dressing, going to the toilet, preparing meals, and also doing admin. I have cerebral palsy, a neurological condition that affects my movement.

Read full article Finding a suitable personal assistant if you're disabled