Long Zhenyang: The resignation that shook Hong Kong media

  • 18 February 2017
Long Zhenyang

Until a few weeks ago, Long Zhenyang held one of the top media jobs in south China.

He was the assistant chief editor of the Hong Kong Commercial Daily, one of three pro-Beijing newspapers in the Chinese territory.

His sudden resignation in February and stated intention to seek political asylum in the United States has jolted the local media community.

Mr Long, 47, has told BBC News that he left mainland China because he had been "persecuted" at the newspaper since late 2014, after he shared posts on his private social media account that were supportive of the pro-democracy protests in Hong Kong.

A devout Christian, the former journalist said he was also upset by a long-running campaign to remove crosses from churches in the eastern Chinese province of Zhejiang.

Read full article Long Zhenyang: The resignation that shook Hong Kong media

Why Chinese people won't boycott Trump fashion

  • 15 February 2017
A model walks in front of the audience at a Taoray Wang show. Left-right: Marla Maples, Tiffany Trump, Ross Mechanic and others. February 11, 2017 in New York City, USA. Image copyright Magnum Photos
Image caption Shunned by some at New York Fashion Week, Ms Trump was welcome at Tao Wang's show

In a week that saw a political storm after Nordstrom dropped Ivanka Trump fashion lines and reports in the US media that her younger sister Tiffany Trump was "shunned" at New York Fashion Week, there was one unlikely win for the first family.

Headlines like "Tiffany Trump is having an awkward time at New York Fashion Week" only served as a reminder that several high-profile designers have been very public in their boycott of the Trump family.

Read full article Why Chinese people won't boycott Trump fashion

The mystery of a Chinese tycoon's disappearance

  • 1 February 2017
Picture of HK newspapers on 1 February 2017 about Xiao Jianhua's disappearance
Image caption Mr Xiao's disappearance was widely covered by Hong Kong newspapers on Wednesday

In 2015 five Hong Kong booksellers disappeared and later resurfaced in mainland China in the hands of Chinese authorities. Now, there are concerns that Chinese tycoon Xiao Jianhua, who has not been seen since last week, has met a similar fate.

The first murmur came from overseas.

Read full article The mystery of a Chinese tycoon's disappearance

Hong Kong chortles over Carrie Lam toilet paper hunt

  • 23 January 2017
File image from Hong Kong taxi Image copyright AFP

Run out of toilet paper? Most of us would solve the problem with a quick trip to the shops.

But in Hong Kong, politician Carrie Lam took a taxi to her former official residence in the city's exclusive Peak district to fetch more rolls.

Read full article Hong Kong chortles over Carrie Lam toilet paper hunt

Hong Kong divided over Forbidden City museum plan

  • 11 January 2017
A man walks through a gate inside the Forbidden City in Beijing on 29 September 2016. Image copyright Getty Images
Image caption Items from the Forbidden City collection would be sent on loan to the museum in Hong Kong

The Forbidden City in Beijing has housed generations of Chinese emperors for hundreds of years.

A museum since 1925, it now welcomes more than 14 million visitors a year, drawn to its ornate gates, inner palaces and nearly two million pieces of imperial art and antiques.

Read full article Hong Kong divided over Forbidden City museum plan

The artist protesters in a polluted city on edge

  • 13 December 2016
Picture of artist protest in Chengdu on 11 December 2016
Image caption This picture of the artists being questioned by police was widely circulated on social network Weibo

The curious case of a group of masked Chinese artists detained by police for a brief, spontaneous protest over pollution serves as a reminder of just how sensitive the issue remains for the authorities. The BBC spoke to one of the artists involved.

China has just seen an unusual cluster of environmental protests as dense smog shrouded a large swathe of the country.

Read full article The artist protesters in a polluted city on edge

Taiwan: A pawn in Trump’s chess game with China?

  • 12 December 2016
Combination photograph of Taiwan's President Tsai Ing-wen, US President-elect Donald Trump, and Chinese President Xi Jinping Image copyright AP
Image caption Mr Trump (centre) will have to negotiate the delicate relationship with Taiwan, led by Tsai Ing-wen (left), and China, led by Xi Jinping (right)

For President-elect Donald Trump, the biggest issue in the US relationship with China is trade. But for Beijing, it's Taiwan.

Mr Trump and his team know this and it's becoming increasingly clear that they hope to use Taiwan as a bargaining chip to get what they want from China.

Read full article Taiwan: A pawn in Trump’s chess game with China?

Is this proof Hong Kong’s 'Umbrella Protests' failed?

  • 11 December 2016
Protesters clash with riot police on September 28, 2014 in Hong Kong Image copyright Getty Images
Image caption Umbrellas became a symbol of the 2014 pro-democracy protests

Hong Kong politics has been stormier than usual lately.

There's been swearing and scuffling in parliament, court battles, and tens of thousands of protesters in the streets.

Read full article Is this proof Hong Kong’s 'Umbrella Protests' failed?

The victims of China's 'War on Law' crackdown

  • 10 December 2016
Media captionThe wives accuse authorities of curtailing freedoms in China

There are plenty of places from which a piece of journalism could be written to mark United Nations Human Rights Day.

But the raising of concern by the UN this week over the case of the missing lawyer Jiang Tianyong makes Beijing as good a choice as any.

Read full article The victims of China's 'War on Law' crackdown

Will new censorship kill Chinese filmmaking?

  • 26 November 2016
Three bureaucrats with ambiguous expressions applaud Image copyright I Am Not Madame Bovary
Image caption I Am Not Madame Bovary pushes the boundaries of Chinese censorship

China's new film censorship laws would, at first blush, be enough to make a director cry.

Movies must not promote gambling, superstition, drug abuse, violence nor teach criminal methods. What's more they should "serve the people and socialism". The horror!

Read full article Will new censorship kill Chinese filmmaking?