Is a rebellion brewing in Nevada?

 
Nevada rancher Cliven Bundy addresses a crowd of protestors near his ranch on 12 April, 2014. Nevada rancher Cliven Bundy has rallied anti-government militias to his side in his confrontation with the federal government

A group of gun-wielding protestors squares off against a government it feels holds no authority. Is it Ukraine? Or Syria?

No, Nevada.

A standoff between a cattle rancher and the US government over grazing fees escalated into something akin to an armed confrontation over the weekend - and while threats of violence were defused, there appears to be no resolution in sight.

The story starts with the desert tortoise.

The Washington Post gives a full timeline of the events leading up to the confrontation, but here's the gist.

Start Quote

This desert drama is the just the latest front in the decades-long government assault on all of our rights”

End Quote Editorial Las Vegas Review-Journal

In 1993, in response to a dropping tortoise population, the federal government set aside hundreds of thousands of acres of federal land in southern Nevada as "protected tortoise habitat". The government prohibited off-road vehicles and mineral prospecting in the area and began buying out ranchers who were grazing their cattle in the designated areas.

They reached a deal with everyone except Cliven Bundy, whose family had been raising cattle on the south-east Nevada land at issue since 1890s.

The government responded by levying fines on Mr Bundy, which he hasn't paid, and getting a court order to remove his cattle from all federal land, which he has ignored.

On 27 March, more than two decades after the dispute first arose, the federal Bureau of Land Management began rounding up Mr Bundy's cattle with the intent to auction them off to pay his government fines, which have now reached $1.2m (£710,000).

Mr Bundy and his family have continued to resist. One of the sons, Dave, was arrested during a confrontation with federal law enforcement. Another, Ammon, was tasered after he kicked a police dog.

The video of the incident has served as a rallying cry for pro-Bundy protestors, many associated with right-wing militia groups. They have flocked to the Bundy ranch from across the region.

Some of the demonstrators were armed and threatened to block government action with force. One protestor said they had plans to put women and children at the front of the crowd so they would be among the first casualties if violence broke out.

On Saturday the government called off the cow-collecting operation and gave back the cows it had collected "because of serious concern about the safety of employees and members of the public".

Federal law enforcement block a road in Nevada. Federal officers block a road during an attempt to round up Cliven Bundy's cattle

The Las Vegas Review-Journal editors write that federal officials are "behaving like thugs loyal to a tin-pot dictator, not public servants who swore to support and defend the US Constitution".

They say that this dispute is about more than tortoises and grazing fees.

"It's about the power of environmentalists and their federal allies to erase a way of life they disagree with," they write. "It's about the federal government's control over most of the land in the West - and 86% of Nevada - and its inability to manage all that land in a competent and productive fashion."

They conclude:

No doubt plenty of city dwellers are laughing at the rubes in ranching country over their disgust with the federal government... But this desert drama is the just the latest front in the decades-long government assault on all of our rights. If we don't defend them, eventually we'll lose them. Then the joke will be on us.

Start Quote

If Bundy and a multitude of his supporters, militia friends and even family members who broke the law are allowed to go unpunished, anarchy will follow”

End Quote Dallas Hyland St George News

The federal government employs both patriots and tyrants, writes Townhall finance editor John Ransom. Concerned citizens need to ask federal officials to pick sides.

"We have to make it make it clear to the bureaucrats that there are only two sides in the war the federal government is waging upon the rest of us," he says. "There is the right, and there is the wrong. And it's no longer sufficient to say you're just following orders."

Legally, writes Power Line Blog's John Hinderaker, Mr Bundy "doesn't have a leg to stand on". He argues that Americans like Mr Bundy deserve sympathy, however.

"Their way of life is one that, frankly, is on the outs," he says.

They don't develop apps. They don't ask for food stamps. It probably has never occurred to them to bribe a politician. They don't subsist by virtue of government subsidies or regulations that hamstring competitors. They aren't illegal immigrants. They have never even gone to law school. So what possible place is there for the Bundys in the Age of Obama?

This confrontation is not about freedom, the Constitution or some idealised rancher way of life, others argue. What is at issue here, they say, is a disturbing precedent set by Mr Bundy's continued flouting of legal authority.

What happens next, wonders the Las Vegas Review-Journal's Steve Sebelius.

"A court order that's not enforced by the federal government is simply another piece of paper," he writes. "It's entirely likely ... that the government will once again face off with Bundy and his militia gang, and that the threat of violence will once again rear its head."

Dallas Hyland writes in Utah's St George News that this could be the start of a growing trend:

The stand-down was necessary to prevent bloodshed, but it must be recognized that if Bundy and a multitude of his supporters, militia friends, and even family members who broke the law, are allowed to go unpunished, anarchy will follow. Other groups, emboldened by the appearance of forcing a stand-down, will only continue to gain momentum. And furthermore, law enforcement as a whole will be rendered impotent as average people with disputes with current laws begin to wonder if they too can call a militia in to force the police to leave them alone.

The pro-Bundy camp is claiming victory for now, but the federal government is not throwing in the towel.

"It's not over," said Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid of Nevada. "We can't have an American people that violate the law and then just walk away from it."

As tanks roll through eastern Ukraine, is a rebellion brewing in Nevada?

 

Comments

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  • rate this
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    Comment number 122.

    gilbert douglass
    17th April 2014 - 20:20

    It is past time for the American people to bring our government officials to account for their misuse of power. They are becoming rich while the American people are getting taxed to death. A revolt has to start somewhere. Nevada is as good a place to start as any.

    right; "fighting terrorism since 1492"

  • rate this
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    Comment number 121.

    120. The whole point here is protection of desert lands 'for the people of the US' - Bundy, a special interest miscreant, has simply used 'the common resource' to graze/bulk up his cattle for slaughter while ignoring the proper and legal cost of grazing - this is anarchy and must be met with force appropriate! Comparing this to Jewish rights in 1930's Germany is inflammatory and disingenuous.

  • rate this
    -1

    Comment number 120.

    Hmmm. Sounds like what the Jews said in Hitler-era Germany, 115.Auf Wiedersehen Pet. Such matters as these will never be treated as serious until it is your own rights, property and freedom that are taken away. Then you will be begging the enlightened and well-armed to take your side. But those fair-minded citizens will long have since perished by the time the masses wake up to their plight.

  • rate this
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    Comment number 119.

    98. Bundy can posture, however, at the first gunshot it will be all over for him as the authorities simply end the standoff - pretty lame in my view to round up some of this guy's herd, then give them back responding to intimidation instead of confiscation for non payment of grazing fees - a 'tragedy of the commons' is being played out here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tragedy_of_the_commons

  • rate this
    -1

    Comment number 118.

    Interestingly, I have heard that Harry Reid's son works for a company that represents a Chinese Solar company that wants to put up a solar energy plant in that area?
    I cannot believe the things that are going on and our top officials in our country are responsible for them yet we sit on our hands, look the other way because the term racist is used for any defiance against what they do.

  • rate this
    -1

    Comment number 117.

    It is past time for the American people to bring our government officials to account for their misuse of power. They are becoming rich while the American people are getting taxed to death. A revolt has to start somewhere. Nevada is as good a place to start as any.

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 116.

    99. monkeywheels

    "there probably was a pile of dead native americans in the 1870's"

    That is a good point. Anyone still owning property, let's learn from it and not repeat their mistake of selling every drop of land to the federal government.

  • rate this
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    Comment number 115.

    A standoff between a cattle rancher and the US government over grazing fees escalated into something akin to an armed confrontation over the weekend As tanks roll through eastern Ukraine, is a rebellion brewing in Nevada?.

    ++++

    Oh come on Anthony Z, trying to draw parallels between the EU/US provoked overthrow of an elected regime by use of fascist thugs is a step too far

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 114.

    I don't have much use for Harry Reid or most environmentalist hype, but seriously, if you graze on BLM land you follow the rules.If you want BLM land to be deeded back to the state, then work for legislation.But don't hold your breath.

  • rate this
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    Comment number 113.

    Gee, I guess now we now why Harry Reid wouldn't permit the Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository to be built in Nevada. It wasn't partisan politics at all, it was to preserve the habitat of the desert tortoise. Too bad about all that nuclear waste building up elsewhere but endangered tortoises must come first!

  • rate this
    -1

    Comment number 112.

    The fed government was created to handle disputes between the states not control themThe 2nd amendment to protect us from thisThis is Nevada's Land! versus Fed Bureaus created by lobbying private interestPrivate farmers put out of business by beef corpsBeef up 3x in short time. Remember the American Indian and railroads Moneyi The corps that get Big subsidies tax breaks. BewarePropgandaCensorship

  • rate this
    -1

    Comment number 111.

    Obama will lose the Senate for sure in November, and he has already lost the House of Representatives with no chance of regaining it.

    We are witnessing the dying throes of the Obama regime, and he is seeking to try and demonstrate his power but the people are finally standing up to him and won't let this bully ruin their country anymore.

    Long live Mr Bundy, long live Nevada, long live America

  • rate this
    +2

    Comment number 110.

    The guys cows are grazing on land that isn't his, he has been accruing fines for the last 20 years, im not sure what part of this justifies armed 'militias' (armed yahoos on a power trip). If id been acrruing fines for 20 years bailiffs would have seized my possessions long ago. Just because 'the man' owns the land it doesnt make it government overreach.

  • rate this
    -1

    Comment number 109.

    So this story ultimately is about Harry Reid and China

    http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/08/31/us-usa-china-reid-solar-idUSBRE87U06D20120831

    'The site chosen with Rory Reid's guidance is in tiny Laughlin, Nevada'

    The federal govt wants this land to belong to China for a solar plant
    Americans want this land to belong to Americans

    Will the future of this land be American or Chinese?

  • rate this
    -1

    Comment number 108.

    The biggest partest of the story is left out which is that they are wanting this land to sell to China's energy company ENN (they agreed to 4.5 million even though its worth est. 45 million) to build a massive solar plant

    Just like how Liam Neeson wrote about they want the stables in NYC for real estate which is why they want to end carriage rides
    they are doing this for China's solar plant

  • rate this
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    Comment number 107.

    I think the Govt. went way over the line & much of the environmentalist stuff is questionable, but Federal land is not private land & if you owe back fees for grazing, so be it.

  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 106.

    77. "The land belongs to the people, not the Bundys, so get off my land, Bundy, and pay the rent."

    That only works if you think the government "belongs to" (or works for) the people anymore.

  • rate this
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    Comment number 105.

    What is in question is whether they have a right to graze.
    They pay taxes (unlike some in high places!)
    103 years free access as of right is enough proof The fact that all the other ranchers were 'bought out' by federal government is precedent and shows government belief that the ranchers are entuitled to graze on common land. Government must negotiate not try to strong-arm their urban values.

  • rate this
    -1

    Comment number 104.

    This incident is a good reason why the U.S Government should not be allowed to own land. They have never proved capable of managing their property. They build new buildings and let the old building rot. They fail to collect rent, or rent at giveaway prices.

  • rate this
    -2

    Comment number 103.

    As an American citizen and a former Marine I say It is only an issue because it is right wing folks who are being choked by a nearing tyranus government. If this was a busload of liberal hippies they would be crying to the Supreme Court for justice. It is truely time to stand. Constitution or Death.

 

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