Entertainment & Arts

Glastonbury fans' tips on surviving the festival

Dodgy toilets, punishing weather, a sprawling tent city and huge crowds - for better or worse, these are the things that make the Glastonbury Festival what it is today.

Some 177,500 people are taking part in the festivities this weekend - hardened festival-goers reveal what it takes to survive for five days at the world's largest greenfield festival.

EDWARD BENT, 20, FROM CHIPPENHAM, WILTSHIRE:

You need a baby wipe bath at all festivals.

Image caption Edward Bent says compromises have to be made at festivals

It's where a baby wipe is used all over your body.

You don't have to be as obvious as having a shower but you know you're clean.

It's a way of maintaining a certain level of hygiene at what's essentially an unhygienic place to be.

I have 50 baby wipes. You make a hell of a lot of compromises at a festival.

JANE SHARPE, 43, FROM IPSWICH:

If you have to go to a Portaloo, be prepared and stuff loo roll up your nose before you open the door to make it bearable.

It's the only way I can go to the toilet - get prepared and dive in.

TIFFANY TAYLOR, 29, FROM CANADA:

Peg down your tent. We saw a tent take off this morning.

It just got lifted up by the wind - we could see it over the food stalls. And never camp near the toilets.

STEVE JONES, 48, FROM CAMBRIDGE:

Don't drink fire-eating liquid.

Image caption Festival fires must be treated with caution

There was a bit of a commotion at a juggling stall one year and it turned out there was a kid who tried using some of their fire-eating liquid, inhaled it and turned a funny grey colour.

A policeman said: "There's an ambulance on the way and will be here in about 45 minutes."

I said: "I'm a doctor and I could call a helicopter." About five minutes later it landed in the circus field and it blew all the stalls over. The kid was all right.

VANESSA VAUGHAN, 45, FROM BATH, WHO BROUGHT WINE GLASSES HOLDERS THAT SIT IN THE GROUND:

Last year the wine kept getting knocked over. We were in those foldy chairs.

If you put a wine glass in a foldy chair it goes flying.

If you put it on the ground it goes flying.

These were in a catalogue and I knew exactly, this is what I need for Glastonbury. If you've got to carry it around, you don't want to lose it.

ANDY HUDSON, A FESTIVAL PARAMEDIC:

Dehydration is a big problem. That's just because of drinking beer in the sun.

Have one bottle of water every three beers. And wear sturdy footwear.

Medically, about 40% is ankle or lower limb injuries - that's when they slip over on the mud.

But I don't think we're going to have any rain this year, so I think we're going to be all right.

CLARE SADLER, FROM CARDIFF:

Remember where you parked your car. Our friend lost his car last year.

He parked and didn't know where it was, so we had to wander the field trying to find it.

About eight of us spent at least an hour looking for it. They've started giving tickets now so you can write it down.

PETER AND CLARE FEVYER, AT THE FESTIVAL WITH CHILDREN JAMES, EIGHT, AND KATIE, SIX:

Image caption The Fevyer family say location is everything

Get here early enough to get a decent pitch.

Last year we didn't get into the family camping field because it was full.

Friends of ours had a campervan so we camped next to them but we ended up miles away.

SETH JACKSON, 24, FROM CORNWALL:

Make sure you have brought wellies, even if there's no chance of rain.

It turns into an absolute mud bath as soon as it starts to rain and your shoes get ruined in about half an hour.

Last year, it was supposed to be a dry year but it was horrendous.

PHILIPPE CASTERMANE, DRUMMER WITH THE ANDREW MORRIS BAND:

Don't forget your tent poles like we did.

We brought a five-man tent, which was supposed to be for all of us and the poles weren't in it.

We had two smaller tents and put the bigger one, for which we had no poles, over the top like a canopy. We're just praying it doesn't rain.

TIM BROWN, FROM HAYTON, NEAR CARLISLE:

My kids came last year and said: "You've got to come."

I've been trying to come for years. They told us to bring diarrhoea tablets.

So far we've not needed them.

Our kids told us to bring earplugs and that was good advice. And good luggage wheels.

There was a trail of abandoned luggage wheels and wheelbarrows when we came in.

RICHARD MOSS, 27, FROM MANCHESTER:

A flag's always a useful thing when you're trying to find your tent.

Always camp near someone who's got the brightest tent or the biggest flag - and away from the toilets.

The people next to us have got a flag - a big yellow smiley face. So that's us sorted.

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