Survey adds 8ft to Tryfan mountain's height

Tryfan is actually higher than it had been thought - measuring 3,010ft

One of Wales' "elite" peaks has grown in stature after an official measurement to verify its height.

It was feared Tryfan, in Snowdonia, could have fallen short of the 3,000ft (914m) elite mountain status needed to keep it one of Wales' 14 highest peaks.

But enthusiasts who scaled it with GPS equipment found the peak came in at 3,010 ft (917.51m) - 8 ft (2.43m) taller than its official measurement.

The project's result was verified by a member of the Ordnance Survey (OS).

Tryfan, one of the best known mountains in the Ogwen Valley, appears on the map at 3,002ft, or 915m.

The new measurement is set to return it to the OS official height before the 1980s.

Before climbing Tryfan, John Barnard, from Mold, Flintshire, one of those involved in the re-measuring, said: "[We're using] exactly the same process as the GPS systems on your car, your sat navs, talking to the satellites, getting signals and measuring distances and then via some complex mathematics we can work out the height above sea level."

Tryfan, Snowdonia Tryfan is one of the 14 "elite" 3,000 ft peaks in Wales and for almost a century mountaineers have tried to complete the challenge of climbing all of them

Tryfan is currently one of the 14 "elite" 3,000ft peaks in Wales and for almost a century mountaineers have tried to complete the challenge of climbing all of them.

The Snowdonia Society has said that Tryfan was still a "wonderful summit", no matter how high it actually was.

The society is a members-based charity working to ensure the beauty and diversity within the national park

Alun Pugh, the director of the Snowdonia Society, said: "It's a wonderful mountain with some fantastic views, that won't change a jot... it has a special part in the heart of anyone who enjoys climbing mountains in Wales."

More on This Story

Related Stories

The BBC is not responsible for the content of external Internet sites

More Wales stories

RSS

Features

BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.