England

Police target domestic violence during World Cup fever

  • 12 June 2010
  • From the section England
Awareness poster
Image caption The leaflet will contain a World Cup fixture chart

Police forces across the north-east of England have teamed up to tackle domestic violence during this year's World Cup.

Cleveland, Northumbria and Durham police's "Kick off" campaign promotes helplines and raises awareness.

According to the police, national research shows a link between alcohol consumption and domestic violence.

Police said there was a "tendency for domestic violence to increase" during high profile sporting events.

The three forces are using the tournament to target offenders and highlight victim support.

Bloodied football

Cleveland police said "hard-hitting" posters showing a bloodied football and detailing contact numbers would be put up in shops, community centres and doctor's surgeries throughout the coming weeks.

Adverts highlighting the campaign will also be on the radio and the back of buses across the region.

Leaflets, containing advice and contact numbers for victims and perpetrators, will be distributed, particularly to shops and businesses that sell alcohol.

The leaflet will also contain a World Cup fixture chart to encourage football fans to take one.

Abuser warning

Chief Constable of Cleveland Police Sean Price said: "We want to encourage victims who have suffered domestic abuse to come forward and access the specialist support that they need."

Northumbria Police Temporary Chief Constable Sue Sim said: "We already know that alcohol can be a factor in domestic violence but what should be a celebration for the country shouldn't become a time of misery for some.

"We're hoping this campaign will serve as a warning to potential abusers."

Durham Constabulary Assistant Chief Constable Michael Banks said : "We recognise there is a tendency for incidents of domestic abuse to increase during high-profile sporting events such as the World Cup."

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