Tyrannosaurus rex charging

Tyrannosaurus rex

One of the greatest carnivores - though not the largest - ever to have walked the Earth, Tyrannosaurus rex (or T-rex) ruled North America during the late Cretaceous period, some 68-65 million years ago. The massive skull of this mighty theropod dinosaur measured 1.5 metres and was balanced by a long heavy tail. The jaw, filled with huge, saw-edged teeth could deliver a devastating bite. Top predator or mighty scavenger, the 'tyrant lizard king' was without doubt a dinosaur to be feared. Thirty specimens have been recovered, some of which (such as those named Sue, Stan and the juvenile Jane!) are almost complete.

Scientific name: Tyrannosaurus

Rank: Genus

Common names:

  • T-rex,
  • T. rex,
  • tyrant lizard king

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Behaviours

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Additional data source: Animal Diversity Web

When they lived

Discover the other animals and plants that lived during the following geological time periods.

Cretaceous period Cretaceous period
The Cretaceous ended with the most famous mass extinction in history - the one that killed the dinosaurs. Prior to that, it was a warm period with no ice caps at the poles.

What killed them

Cretaceous-Tertiary mass extinction Cretaceous-Tertiary mass extinction
The Cretaceous-Tertiary mass extinction - also known as the K/T extinction - is famed for the death of the dinosaurs. However, many other organisms perished at the end of the Cretaceous including the ammonites, many flowering plants and the last of the pterosaurs.

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