Thomson's gazelle on savanna at sunrise

Thomson's gazelle

Thomson's gazelles are found mainly in Tanzania and Kenya, and there's a small population in southern Sudan. They form herds of up to 200 individuals, but form much looser groups while migrating. Like other gazelles they perform 'stotting' or 'pronking' when alarmed by a predator. This involves jumping repeatedly with legs stiff and back curved and landing on all fours. Stotting is thought to demonstrate to the predator the amount of energy the gazelle has and thus to forestall a long chase by telling it 'I'm too athletic for you to catch'.

Scientific name: Eudorcas thomsoni

Rank: Species

Common names:

Tommie

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Distribution

The Thomson's gazelle can be found in a number of locations including: Africa. Find out more about these places and what else lives there.

Habitats

The following habitats are found across the Thomson's gazelle distribution range. Find out more about these environments, what it takes to live there and what else inhabits them.

Tropical grassland Tropical grassland
Tropical grasslands include the savanna usually associated with Africa, and savanna-type grasslands found in India, Australia, Nepal and the Americas. They are characterised by drought-resistant shrubs and grasses, dotted with trees such as acacias or baobabs.

Additional data source: Animal Diversity Web

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