A Surinam toad lying on a large leaf

Surinam toad

Surinam toads have a unique spawning ritual and reproduction method. Following an extraordinary mating dance, where the female lays her eggs on the male's belly, the male then fertilises the eggs and rolls them into pouches on her back. After bypassing the larval stage completely, fully developed froglet miniatures pop out of the holes in the mother's skin. Large flippered feet and greatly flattened bodies make these amphibians well suited to life in South America's murky ponds and swamps.

Scientific name: Pipa pipa

Rank: Species

Common names:

Suriname toad

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Distribution

Map showing the distribution of the Surinam toad taxa

Species range provided by WWF's Wildfinder.

The Surinam toad can be found in a number of locations including: Amazon Rainforest, South America. Find out more about these places and what else lives there.

Habitats

The following habitats are found across the Surinam toad distribution range. Find out more about these environments, what it takes to live there and what else inhabits them.

Behaviours

Discover what these behaviours are and how different plants and animals use them.

Additional data source: Animal Diversity Web

Conservation Status

Least Concern

  1. EX - Extinct
  2. EW
  3. CR - Threatened
  4. EN - Threatened
  5. VU - Threatened
  6. NT
  7. LC - Least concern

Population trend: Stable

Year assessed: 2004

Classified by: IUCN 3.1

Classification

  1. Life
  2. Animals
  3. Vertebrates
  4. Amphibians
  5. Frogs and toads
  6. Pipidae
  7. Pipa
  8. Surinam toad

Video collections

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  • Wildlife wind-ups Wildlife wind-ups

    It's not only humans that like a good joke, animals play all kinds of tricks on one another in their attempts to gain an advantage.

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